Sunday, June 16, 2019

The Community in Hawaii Stepped In Beautifully When the Government Failed to Help People Displaced by a Volcano

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by Meadow Clark, The Organic Prepper:

People living in Hawaii weren’t happy with the “solutions” provided by the government for people displaced by Kilauea’s lengthy eruption. So instead of complaining, they banded together as a community and solved the problem themselves.

Photo credits: Facebook

The eruption of Kilauea displaced thousands of people.

Economic Collapse Reality Check: Could The United States Handle Food Rationing?

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by Vicki Batts, via Silver Doctors:

Food rationing has been implemented in the U.S. before, but there would be serious problems with trying to implement rationing today. Here’s why…

Could Americans survive a disaster? Experts say that even food rationing efforts, similar to those of World War I & II, would be colossal failures in today’s world. During those times, citizens were encouraged to grow their own Victory gardens and did their best to minimize food waste. “Doing your part” was essential, and making do was implied. The liberal cry-bullies of today would certainly be in for quite the rude awakening, wouldn’t they?

Are You Ready for Hurricane Season? The Prepper’s Hurricane Survival Guide

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by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

It’s that time of year again – hurricane season has arrived.

In North America, hurricane season officially lasts from June 1st through November 30th. However, that doesn’t mean that a hurricane can’t be stirred up at other times of the year – it’s just less common.

The hurricane season of 2017 left devastating marks on the US Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico,  and the Gulf and East coasts of the United States. Many areas that were damaged by floods and high winds have still not recovered and parts of Puerto Rico are still without electricity and running water.

Is your city SURVIVABLE in a collapse, civil war or natural disaster?

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by Mike Adams, Natural News:
As the editor of Natural News, one thing I fully realize is that the window of opportunity to reliably use the internet to publish information is rapidly closing. The easy access to information that you enjoy today via the internet won’t always function the way it does now. Police state censorship, power grid failures, EMP weapons, civil war, systemic financial collapse and solar flares all threaten the continuity of online information and could instantly break the internet as you know it today.

How to Make Campfire Last All Night?

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from Tarus Gul:

6 Critical Items That Have Disappeared in the Immediate Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

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by Tess Pennington, Ready Nutrition:

Before something like Hurricane Harvey, who would’ve imagined the kind of destruction that would literally immobilize a major U.S. metropolitan area for what could potentially be weeks if not months? As of this writing, we’re 72 hours into the aftermath of this major disaster and supplies are already running low.

Amid the images of loss and destruction, hurricane survivors know they must restock provisions to prepare for another week or more of sheltering in place. Now, imagine 6.2 million people trying to stock up at the same time. Panic buying is gripping the affected area and beginning to overload local and regional communities. Ahead of the hurricane making landfall the vast majority of people simply figured that the aftermath would, at most, last a few days. No one ever contemplated that real possibility that this scenario would be the end result or believed they would have to evacuate after the storm hit.

In fact, many have evacuated the city and moved to other Texas towns and now those areas are beginning to exhaust supplies as well. In any disaster, when the needs of the people are strained, frustration can quickly descend into a breakdown. While this is something no one wants to see happen, with a disaster such as this one, it is very easy to see how it can overwhelm government emergency response plans.

In an article explaining the breakdowns that occur after disasters, it was written, “When the needs of the population cannot be met in an allotted time frame, a phenomenon occurs and the mindset shifts in people. They begin to act without thinking and respond to changes in their environment in an emotionally based manner, thus leading to chaos, instability and a breakdown in our social paradigm.”

This is what is to be expected when so many people are hit with a rapid, far from equilibrium event. Keeping up with the desperate and immediate demands of hundreds of thousands of people will undoubtedly be a challenge in and of itself and supply trucks can only do so much, especially with flood water still standing on highway systems. Those living in this aftermath have a long road ahead of them, and knowing which items disappear off the shelves first can help them better prepare and stay on top of their personal supplies.

Just 72 hours after this disaster, here are the five supplies that have become difficult or impossible to find.

Gasoline

Concerns over closed refineries and disrupted pipelines erupted into a full-blown panic run on gasoline across Texas cities. Here’s the crazy thing, the shortages are not just happening in the greater Houston area, but two hundred miles north in Dallas, as well as in the cities of Austin and San Antonio, TX. This panic for gas is so insane that we are seeing gas lines that have been likened to the 1970’s.

While state officials are saying, “there is no need to worry,” things are getting real in Texas and whether they want to admit, the situation is beginning to get heated. So much so that reports of fist fights for fuel are popping up.

Water

Clean drinking water, the main staple in any disaster supply, is quickly being purchased faster than they can restock it. If hurricane victims do not have a high-quality water filter, they have to take their chances finding a store that has been restocked. In the flood ravaged areas, critical infrastructure has been damaged making it difficult for trucks to resupply the affected area, thus adding to the panic buying. Desperate residents do not know when this disaster area will normalize, so they want to grab supplies when they can to ensure their family has what they need.

In the city of Beaumont, things have become dire since the city shut off the municipal water supply, leaving 100,000 people with no other option but to hunt for water in surrounding areas. As well, the local hospital had to close its doors out of fear of water contamination, one of many immediate post-disaster threats we discussed in a previous article.

CNN reports that city officials plan to establish a water distribution point on Friday.

Meanwhile, earlier Thursday, residents lined up at stores hours before they opened in hopes of getting whatever bottled water they could find.

Read More @ ReadyNutrition.com

Woodcutting When the SHTF: What You Need to Know To Hastily Acquire a Wood Supply

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by Jeremiah Johnson, Ready Nutrition:

ReadyNutrition Readers, this piece is designed to help you plan out your woodcutting when the SHTF…because you’ll have to do it on the Q-T and keep your noise signature at a minimum.  Seems easy, right?  Well, it’s not complicated, but there are some finer points to it.  Right now (with half of my state of residence burning) we are not allowed to use chainsaws to cut wood.  Yep, I’ve been hitting it with the bowsaw and the axe…on “low” smoke days.

Bringing me to the next point.  You will need certain tools, to keep the noise down and also to conserve fuel.  Here they are:

  1. Bowsaw, 39-40 inch blade
  2. Bowsaw, 18-24 inch blade
  3. Axe, single-edged (I like anything made by Kobalt)
  4. Hatchet – make sure it is one solid, continuous piece…Estwing makes some good ones
  5. Maul: Preferably 8-lbs or more
  6. Splitting Wedges – assorted sizes
  7. Good Sharpening tool, and assorted sharpening stones

Your ax is going to be used to fell dead standing timber and also to segment large-diameter trees that would take forever with a bowsaw.  None of the methods are totally silent, however, in comparison to the chainsaw, they are.  This is a reason that I place so much emphasis on cutting wood in the “off” season: that is to say, don’t wait until the fall.  Cut wood throughout the summer.

Heating is one thing, but cooking is another.  If you need to prepare food, you’ll need that fireplace or woodstove to be well-fueled.  When you’re trimming branches, if they’re about four inches in diameter or less, use the short-bladed bowsaw.  The longer blade is used on your larger pieces, up to about a foot max.  Then it is up to you to quarter them with your ax, your maul, and your splitting wedges.

If you have a fireplace or a woodstove, you need to measure the diagonal inside length, knock it down a couple of inches, and form a template for yourself.  I use an old 1” x 4” piece for myself.  This way you can use that piece of board to set against the edge of your log and scribe to make a cut for the piece to fit in your fireplace or woodstove.  This will save you a lot of time measuring, and you can keep the template for a long time…just make sure it doesn’t become mixed up in your wood supply.

After the SHTF, you can also bring pieces into your basement to saw and chop away at to reduce the noise.  You want to cut wood at times when there are other noises around to cover your activities.  Early morning before the sunrise or at night is not convenient times, as these are periods of the day when the surrounding noise is subdued.  Your hatchet you want to use to trim smaller branches off of pieces and also to cut small pieces of kindling and tinder.  Make sure you have a tinderbox and a kindling box to use for each of these fire-starting sizes of wood.

Cutting wood in this manner is a heck of a workout.  Please review my past articles on woodcutting.  You want to cut in the early morning hours, and in the evening hours to break up the physical exertion.  You’ll need to stay ahead of the game, as that wood supply will burn up fast.  After the SHTF, you will need someone pulling security, and preferably someone who can rotate into the woodcutting operation.

Ex: John cuts wood for one hour, and Al pulls security.  Then vice-versa

It’s a little different if you’re out in the forest cutting larger pieces to take back home.  Much depends on the weather and how far you have to transport your wood.  Also, the method of transport makes a difference.  When you have 2 to 3 feet of snow on the ground, you’ll want one of those plastic toboggans to drag the pieces back with.  A snowmobile is good for a fast dash, but the engine is a dead giveaway.  You’re also limited as to the size of the pieces that you can drag back.

Read More @ ReadyNutrition.com

How to Prepare for Hurricane Florence When You Live a Few Hundred Miles Inland

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by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

When I moved to southwestern Virginia, I really didn’t expect to be dealing with hurricanes. But, as I’ve just learned, a system like Hurricane Florence could affect places that are as much as 350+ miles from the shore. So, if you are one of the 112 million and then some of Americans in the area classified as the “East Coast” – particularly the southern to mid-Atlantic part – you need to get prepared.

When and where will Hurricane Florence make landfall?

Hurricane Florence is picking up power and could make landfall as a Category 5 as soon as Thursday. If you aren’t familiar with hurricanes, a Category 5 hurricane has sustained winds of 156 mph or stronger.  It is the highest classification for hurricanes.

When ‘The Event’ Hits The Super-Rich Will Not Survive The Long Term Without Survival Skills

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by Susan Duclos, All News Pipeline:

While the super-rich and elite have been preparing for years for some type of “Event,” their concerns and worries about the fallout after said event occurs, are far different than those of us that do not have billions of dollars to hide from the masses.

Over the past few years we have noted an increase in statements and stories by members of the “super-wealthy” crowd showing how they are preparing for some event that would cause the collapse of civilizationIn 2015 we saw they were buying up “boltholes” with “private airstrips,” in the event the poor rose up against them. In 2017 it was reported that a number of “super-rich” were buying up boltholes in New Zealand in preparation for the “apocalypse.”

Build your own first aid kit with natural remedies

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by Tracey Watson, Natural News:

There is no doubt that many parts of the globe are in crisis, and to many it seems as though a natural or man-made disaster could strike in their area at any moment. While it is always important to have certain basic first aid items like Band-Aids and bandages on hand in case of emergency, there are other, more natural items that can prove to be worth their weight in gold when disaster strikes. After all, it may not always be possible to run out to a pharmacy or grocery store to purchase medical supplies.

Your natural first aid kit can be used effectively to treat a variety of conditions, including burns, cuts, Poison Ivy and other rashes, bug bites, stomach upset and diarrhea, bleeding and bruises, to name a few.

Some suggested survival kit items include:

A Maslow-Like Hierarchy of Survival, by I. M. Learning

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from Survival Blog:

Maslow’s Hierarchy details the steps a person needs to achieve to be able to function at a level of success.

Food and Water
The first step is ensuring a supply of food and water. Any newbie to prepping is at least aware of this in the basic sense. But how much food and how much water is necessary? Where do you put it? How do you keep the food usable and the water available and potable?

Twenty-Five Year Food Buckets
I started out, as I’m sure many new to prepping do, buying 25-year food buckets. I’m not saying that isn’t a good idea, but I began scrutinizing what was actually in those buckets. Not only does everything require some amount of water, but a lot of those buckets are full of powder to make drinks. So, I changed tactics and began just ordering the meat buckets. Unfortunately, I bought buckets that had two to three times as much rice as there was meat. Again, I began doing some research on canned foods and was surprised how many cans of meat and bags of rice I could buy for a fraction of the cost of one 25-year bucket.