Saturday, April 10, 2021

Gold and Latin: Twin Pillars of Western Rejuvenation

by Antonius Aquinas, Antonius Aquinas:

Gold Coinage of the Latin Monetary Union

After Brexit, there has been a growing number of voices within the European Union and among various nationalistic groups arguing that English should be replaced as the official language since now only Ireland and Malta retain English.

The loudest quarter calling for a change has come from the French who, not surprisingly, want their own tongue to become the lingua franca of the EU.  Eric Zemmour, a French conservative commentator, asserts, “I think this is the time to launch a counter-offensive in favour of French, to recall that French was the original language of EU institutions.”*

Even the TV pundits are now asking, without bothering to investigate, “what’s wrong with gold?

by Harvey Organ, Harvey Organ Blog:

GOLD DOWN $13.50 TO $1744.10//SILVER DOWN 27 CENTS TO $25.24//HUGE QUEUE JUMP AT GOLD COMEX OF 3.5 TONNES AS NEW STANDING RESTS THIS WEEKEND AT 83.3 TONNES//SILVER ALSO ADVANCES TO 14.8 MILLION OZ//MAY OI IN SILVER REMAINS EXTREMELY HIGH AT 109,171 CONTRACTS//ONE COVID COMMENTARY TONIGHT//ANDREW MAGUIRE AND ALASDAIR MACLEOD: A MUST WATCH VIDEO//RUSSIA VS UKRAINE//ISRAEL VS IRAN/ USA DATA: PPI RED HOT//SWAMP STORIES FOR YOU TONIGHT

The Fed vs. the Real World

by Michael Wilkerson, American Thinker:

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has made some interesting statements in recent weeks about the Fed’s view of inflation.  In summary, Chairman Powell has stated that overall inflation remains below the Fed’s 2% long-term objective, and that while reopening of the economy could produce price increases later in the year, inflationary pressures from rising prices are likely to be neither large nor persistent.  Given the transient nature of these effects, and a long history of deflationary pressures in the U.S. and around the world, Chairman Powell believes that inflation isn’t something to worry about.  And in any event, Chairman Powell reassures us that the Fed “has the tools to deal with that [inflation]” should it rise above long-term target levels.

53% Of Canadians On Brink Of Insolvency

from ZeroHedge:

53% of Canadians are on the verge of insolvency and are $200 or less away from not being able to pay their monthly bills and obligations, while 25% took on more debt during the pandemic, according to a new survey by MNP.

The news comes as Canada’s MNP consumer debt index hits a five-year high, and is a 10-point jump from a December survey, according to Bloomberg.

Largest Increase in Margin Debt Since 2007 Fuels Stock Market

by Mish Shedlock, The Street:

Margin debt is on the fastest rise since 2007 and before that, 1999, right before the dotcom bubble burst.
Everything Rally 

The “Everything Rally” is underway, fueled by borrowed money.

As of late February, investors had borrowed a record $814 billion against their portfolios, according to data from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Wall Street’s self-regulatory arm. That was up 49% from one year earlier, the fastest annual increase since 2007, during the frothy period before the 2008 financial crisis. Before that, the last time investor borrowings had grown so rapidly was during the dot-com bubble in 1999.

Hungarian central bank boosts its gold reserves by 3000% in less than 3 years

by Ronan Manly, BullionStar:

The central bank of Hungary, the Magyar Nemzeti Bank (MNB), has just announced a purchase of a massive 63 tonnes of Good Delivery gold bars, and in doing so tripled the nation’s gold holdings from 31.5 tonnes to 94.5 tonnes.

In its press release about the huge transaction, published 7 April, the Hungarian central bank explains its rationale for the dramatic purchase of what is approximately 5040 large (400 oz) gold bars, highlighting that gold has no credit risk and no counterparty risk, and so reinforces sovereign trust over all economic environments (normal and extreme), while being one of the most crucial reserve assets that a central bank can hold.

Central Banks Add Over 8 Tons of Gold to Reserves in February

by Peter Schiff, Schiff Gold:

Despite a significant selloff by Turkey, central banks globally added a net 8.8 tons of gold to their reserves in February, according to the latest data compiled by the World Gold Council.

Gold-buying by central banks slowed last year from the record pace we saw in 2018 and 2019, and that trend has continued into 2021, but many countries continue to load up on the yellow metal. Turkey and Russia’s sales through the first two months of the year have pushed net central bank reserves down, even while several countries continue to boost their gold holdings.

ARCHEGOS & CREDIT SUISSE – TIP OF THE ICEBERG

by Egon Von Greyerz, Gold Switzerland:

Bill Hwang, the founder of the hedge fund Archegos that just lost $30 billion, probably didn’t realise when he named his company that it was predestined for big things.

Archegos is a Greek word which means leader or one who leads so that others may follow.

JP Morgan CEO acknowledges “something has gone terribly wrong” in America

by Simon Black, Sovereign Man:

Last week I wrote to you about billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio’s most recent advice for people to diversify their investments OUT of the US dollar.

Dalio didn’t pull any punches when he laid out his analysis for America’s economic future.

He warned readers of the very real risk of stagflation (starting “late this year”) and tax increases that could be even “more shocking than expected”.

WEF Warns of Cyber Attack Leading to Systemic Collapse of the Global Financial System

by Whitney Webb, Activist Post:

A report published last year by the WEF-Carnegie Cyber Policy Initiative calls for the merging of Wall Street banks, their regulators and intelligence agencies as necessary to confront an allegedly imminent cyber attack that will collapse the existing financial system.

In November 2020, the World Economic Forum (WEF) and Carnegie Endowment for International Peace co-produced a report that warned that the global financial system was increasingly vulnerable to cyber attacks. Advisors to the group that produced the report included representatives from the Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, the International Monetary Fund, Wall Street giants likes JP Morgan Chase and Silicon Valley behemoths like Amazon.