Former NIH Director Admits There Was No Evidence For COVID Six-Foot Social Distancing Rules

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from The National Pulse:

Former director of the National Institutes of Health (NIHFrancis Collins is admitting the stringently enforced social-distancing measures endorsed by top health agencies were not underpinned by firm scientific evidence. The revelation came in closed-door testimony earlier this year before the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Pandemic.

Collins was asked whether he recalled there being any scientific evidence backing up the six-feet social distancing requirements enforced by state governments across the county during the COVID-19 pandemic. “I do not,” the former NIH director replied.

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Pressed further on the issue, Collins clarified that not only was he not shown any evidence of the need for social distancing at the time, but he hasn’t seen any scientific evidence to back up the practice since the pandemic. “Since then, it has been an awfully large topic. Have you seen any evidence since then supporting six feet?” Collins was asked by a committee staffer during the testimony. The former NIH director responded: “No.”

Social distancing measures played a consequential role in the closure of businesses and schools, leading to the loss of significant educational opportunities and critical small-business resources. Mask mandates and social distancing lead to a steep decline in learning levels among students, especially the very young. According to one report, masking likely resulted in a 350 percent surge in childhood speech-learning delays.

Echoing Collins’s admission, Dr. Anthony Fauci acknowledged in January this year that the social distance guidelines he advocated for were not based on science. According to Dr. Fauci, the six-feet social distancing recommendation “just sort of appeared.” Additionally, the former public health official confessed that the COVID lab leak hypothesis is not a conspiracy theory.

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