Canada and Belgium Lead the Way on Euthanasia

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from Moonbattery:

To see what liberals have in store for us, look to the countries where leftists have the least resistance. Canada and Belgium suggest that the economic inefficiency of socialized medicine will be addressed with the final solution.

In Canada, even some Catholics go along:

Dr. Danielle Kain … was appointed to the directorship of palliative care at Providence Hospital in Kingston, Ontario, July 1.

The Kingston hospital is one of 22 health care institutions in Ontario under the sponsorship of Catholic Health Sponsors of Ontario (CHSO). The CHSO was formed in 1998 to assume responsibility for institutions formerly under the guidance and management of congregations of religious sisters.

Kain is both a staunch proponent and practitioner of euthanasia.

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Medical Assistance in Dying — which has already been presented as a cure for long wait timesanorexiaPTSDpoverty, and needing a wheelchair lift (not for regretting sex change surgery though) — sounds great to Kain:

Kain has argued that all publicly funded institutions, including Catholic hospitals, should be compelled to offer MAiD.

Kain says death by doctor can be “both poignant and peaceful.”

Turning to Belgium — where young women are euthanized for feeling depressed — we see that it is plenty poignant but not always peaceful:

Alexina Wattiez, who was just 36 years old, sought euthanasia after being diagnosed with terminal cancer. In 2021, her doctor informed her that she would not survive for another year, and by March of 2022, her health was deteriorating.

Christophe Stulens, Wattiez’s partner, was there when she died, along with his 15-year-old daughter, Tracy. A doctor and two nurses came to the home that the three shared to carry out the euthanasia. “After a short night’s sleep, I was woken up by a nurse who told me that Alexina was doing very badly,” Stulens said. “Then the doctor took some syringes and we were asked if we wanted to say goodbye.”

Stulens and his daughter were told to wait outside, so they went onto the terrace, but what they thought would be a peaceful death quickly turned horrific: they heard screaming.

“I recognized her voice,” he said. “Afterwards we saw her lying on the bed with her eyes and mouth open.”

An autopsy was performed, and found that Wattiez died of asphyxiation. Allegedly, the nurses took turns using a pillow to suffocate her.

An overweight old guy with mobility issues in Utah and a disabled veteran in Tennessee suggest that government agencies outside the traditional healthcare purview could be brought in to conduct these procedures more efficiently, when euthanasia is inevitably extended beyond the sick and the poor to others whose existence is inconvenient to authorities, such as dissidents.

The drugs used in assisted suicide are often the same used for executions, and they are frequently known to fail. Additionally, while the process of dying may look peaceful, in reality, there is a serious possibility of severe pain.

Victims immobilized by drugs may experience any extreme of agony without external indications.

The drawbacks of pharmaceutical homicide are among the arguments for returning to hanging and firing squads for executions. But that approach to euthanasia would require authorities to admit what they are doing.

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