QUANTUM COMPUTER DECRYPTS OF BIOMETRICALLY SECURED DATA

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by Joseph P. Farrell, Giza Death Star:

Last Monday you’ll recall I blogged about the possibility of “rogue billionaires” creating their own nuclear weapons (or, short of creating them, buying them).  As I noted in that blog, the possibility became part of a DARPA study over a decade ago by came to the attention of a Wall Street Journal reporter during the administration of Donald Trump. (By the way, DARPA stands for Diabolically Apocalyptic Research Projects Agency, as we like to call it here.)

TRUTH LIVES on at https://sgtreport.tv/

I have a similar concern today, with this very important article shared by V.T. (with our thanks), and the ideas and implications it contains:

Prepare Now for When Quantum Computers Break Biometric Encryption: Trust Stamp

Note that the central topic of the article are biometrically secured systems.  We’re all familiar with these in some form or fashion: the voice-activated safe or vault door, that will only open to a particular word spoken by a specific individual or individuals. Voice prints are unique to individuals, as are fingerprints.  We are all familiar with those as well: the thumbprint or hand-scanner, the retina scanner, and so on.

But as our colleague and friend Catherine Fitts likes to remind us, there is no cyber system that is secure. technology always evolves, and a way around the “impenertable armor” or the highest possible speed is always and inevitably found.  The same holds true for biometric systems. For imagine a quantum computer able to process biometric security systems fast enough to literally contrive entirely fictitious thumb prints, voice prints, or retina scans that can through sheer volume eventually defeat such systems.

Now imagine using biometric systems to encrypt information. Quantum computers might be able even to decrypt these as well.

But, as the article notes, there’s a catch, and this is where my high octane speculation of the day comes in:

Digital identity and trust provider Trust Stamp has released a white paper explaining the threat of quantum computing to biometric systems and making recommendations to minimize the risks.

Quantum computers will open opportunities to solve problems in biometrics, drug synthesis, financial modeling, and weather forecasting, among other areas, according to Trust Stamp. But they will also be able to decrypt most of the encryption systems used to secure the internet and protect data today.

While experts expect quantum computers will not be able to scale to defeat such systems for at least another ten years, the white paper claims, entities should address “harvest now, decrypt later” (HNDL) attacks proactively.

Through an HNDL approach, an attacker could capture encrypted data pending the availability of quantum computing-enabled decryption. It is worth noting that this cyber threat would be heavily resource-intensive to perform. Such an attack would most likely only be feasible by a nation-state and would target information that would remain extremely valuable for decades in the future. (Emphasis added)

In other words, given enough time and resources, quantum computers might even be able to punch through the encryption that biometric systems enable. But such would, as the article notes, be resource intensive, requiring massive computing power (and most likely, electrical and financial power to sustain), such as would “only be feasible by a nation-state.”

Or, perhaps, by a large and powerful corporation, or for that matter, a “rogue billionaire”, and I can think of a few rogue billionaires with backgrounds in information technology that have shown a proclivity to make bargains with nation-states for access to otherwise private data via back doors. Now imagine those back doors are enable by quantum computers, and you get the idea; it would be an INSLAW-Promis software scandal…

… on steroids.

And while we’re exploring this high octane speculation and possibility, that “INSLAW-Promis scenario on steroids” promises (pun intended) quite a headache for Mr. Globaloney and his lackeys’ plans for Central Bank Digital Currencies and one-way mirrors behind which they can hide their own activities and frauds, for all it would take is a rogue billionaire with the means and motivations to expose it all, to everyone.   That scenario is not new either, and was actually made the theme of a movie starring Sandra Bullock, titled The Net… Indeed, the quantum computer capability would enable vast new areas for fraud as biometric systems themselves are hacked and records are altered.

So are there such things as rogue billionaires?

Well, if you don’t believe that, then you haven’t been following the merry antics of the billionaires of the World Economic Forum as they get together every year to go rogue at Davos.

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