Tuesday, October 22, 2019

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS: START BEFORE THE STORM

0

by Mac Slavo, SHTF Plan:

With hurricane season in full swing as many brace for tropical storm Dorian’s arrival, most don’t want to be left in a bad situation waiting on help from the government that may not ever come. If you live in a hurricane zone, you may want to consider boosting your preps for one if you haven’t already.

The most important thing to remember is to hide from the wind but run from the water.  Don’t get caught in flooding and if it looks like that’s a possibility, grab your bag and bug out. Water weighs about 1,700 pounds per cubic yard. As it’s pushed by hurricane winds, it can act as a battering ram, pummeling the shore and buildings.

Elements of a Security System – Part 2

0

by J.M., Survival Blog:

(Continued from Part 1.)

The final aspects you need to consider when planning a security system are the types of threats you need to be able to detect. If you live in a wooded area where there are a lot of experienced woodsmen and hunters, you’ll have to consider how to detect people that know how to move silently and effectively and are more likely to notice things like tripwires or trail cameras. On the other hand, if you’re in an area that may primarily experience urban sheeple migrating in search of resources after a disaster, your security situation will be simplified, since most of those folks will take the path of least resistance with minimal regard for stealth. An absolute worst-case scenario would be trying to set up a security system to detect people that have military training and equipment, since they will tend to be more observant about wires, alarms, infrared light, etc. As with any system, the more complex and extensive you make it, the harder it will be to maintain and the more likely you are to get a lot of false alarms.

Elements of a Security System – Part 4

0

by J.M., Survival Blog:

(Continued from Part 3.)

The second type of alerting – remote signal back to a centralized alarm console with a wired or wireless connection when the tripwire is tripped – can be a bit more complicated. In either case you can use something as simple as the clothespin switch to connect two wires to close the circuit, or to ‘press’ the button on a remote transmitter to trigger a relay that set off a light/buzzer.

Still Prepping After All These Years

0

by Tony T., Survival Blog:

I have written this to encourage others that may be getting weary with the never-ending labors of preparation.

I have divided this into four parts:

1. Learning from my family.
2. Adjusting to my own family.
3. Persevering through the years
4. Where we are now.

Turmeric: This ancient super spice can offer unmatched healing properties

0

by Kristine Payne, Natural News:

Many people consider turmeric (Curcuma longa) to be the most powerful herb on the planet. Others may even argue that it could potentially be the most effective nutritional supplement to ever exist. Such claims are not unfounded. This ancient super spice has been used in India for thousands of years not only for its exotic flavor, but also for its medicinal properties.

Selco on Martial Law: Forget your “movie illusions about being a freedom fighter”

by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

Let’s talk about martial law. This is when the normal law of the land is suspended and the authority comes from the military or federal government.

One recent example of undeclared martial law in the US was when the police were looking for the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing and went door to door, forcing innocent people to come outside with their hands on their heads at gunpoint, while their homes were searched without warrants. 

It turns out that many of us have some serious misconceptions of what it’s really like to live through a martial law situation. I asked Selco, who has personally been through it, to clear up the myths and tell us what it’s actually like. You can always count on him for the unvarnished truth, and that’s what we need to be prepared to survive extreme situations.

Build the Plan vs. Test the Plan – Part 2

0

by T.R., Survival Blog:

(Continued From Part 1.)

During 2018, I made a dot chart counting how many days fit into each category A, B, C and D in terms of readiness and then converted the “dots” into a percentage of time for the year. As a corollary, if things are leaning environmentally towards TEOTWAWKI, then we would already be limiting our “D” types of trips away from home and/or starting to pursue our exit via our “B” plan scenario. If things look particularly grim but quasi-temporary, then we would limit our “C” scenarios to avoid leaving home for long blocks of time and leaning towards staying home at night altogether.

Food Storage: The Basics

0

by Pete Thorsen, Survival Blog:

More and more people are seeing the common sense in having some stored food on hand in case of emergencies. Many of these people are not preppers but just want to have the peace of mind knowing they have some extra food on hand for “just in case.”

The only problem for some is the question of “Where to start?” With food it is an easy start. Well, then again, maybe not so easy after all. If you decide to have food on hand for an emergency then you should think just that one line through some. What kind of an emergency? Does it even matter? If the emergency is the power being out and you live in an all-electric house you would either need food that could be eaten without cooking or you would have to have an alternate way to cook the food instead of your microwave or electric range.

Build the Plan vs. Test the Plan – Part 4

0

by T.R., Survival Blog:

(Continued from Part 3.)

Later that morning/early afternoon, we sat down at the kitchen table (having brewed a pot of coffee on the spare camp stove from the basement according to our “A” plan) and talked through this. We needed a balance of water, fuel, gear/shelter, food and safety/security. Optimizing the mix of these five items (plus cash and valuables) and optimizing how to pack them efficiently with some degree of access to the right items in what order took significantly longer than either of us expected when a filter criteria of “not coming back” was inserted vs “we are leaving for a temporary camping trip”.

Tips for becoming unnoticeable: When SHTF, being a gray man can save your life

0

by Zoey Sky, The Common Sense Show:

During a disaster scenario, you can’t just rely on your survival stockpile. Your skills are just as important when SHTF, especially the ability to become a “gray man.” (h/t to ModernSurvivalOnline.com)

The gray man theory

You can just bug out when things go south, but if you decide to stay home, at some point you’ll need to leave to find resources or maintain your property. How do you avoid looters and attackers?

Hide in plain sight by becoming a gray man to avoid detection. Simply put, a gray man is someone who doesn’t draw attention to himself. This kind of “survival psychology and urban camouflage” technique enables you to “disappear” when you’re in a public place.

Build the Plan vs. Test the Plan – Part 3

0

by T.R., Survival Blog:

(Continued from Part 2.)

Some background: I still work almost full time, but portions of the year are full throttle 60+ hour weeks and other blocks are much lighter, with my husband retired from the military. We wanted a vacation in terms of scenery and wildlife and we wanted to test our plans across a number of elements.

To appropriately field test our plans with a degree of stress testing that would replicate a certain amount of tension present in real threat condition whilst isolating certain elements one at a time to calibrate parts of our plan in a systematic way, we tried to set a few parameters that would shape the testing conditions: 1. Pack the car and get out of dodge quickly, with the hope to leave in less than 4-6 hours; 2. Be on the road with gasoline services to get as far as possible and then artificially cut ourselves off from stores, gas and retail purchase power for some period of time. 3. Deal with weather/climate and test shelter, security/safety, water, food, health/fitness and personal fulfillment (wildlife, nature and reading) for a 30 consecutive day period of time.

It Could Never Happen Here: Many People Won’t Consider the Grim Reality of Long-term Survival

0

by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

How dark are you willing to go in your preparedness efforts?

If you’re like a lot of people, there’s only a certain level of SHTF that you are willing to imagine. And that means you aren’t going to be prepared for it if things get worse than the level you can envision.

If you’re reading this, you’re probably a prepper or have some SHTF awareness. Maybe you’re participating in my National Preparedness Month Daily Challenge. If not, it is a series of small challenges – mostly thought exercises – to help people get better prepared by taking a step every day.

PREP YOUR TECH: HOW TO DEFEND YOUR ACCOUNTS FROM HACKING

0

by Mac Slavo, SHTF Plan:

Prepping isn’t always about survival when the SHTF.  There are times when we need to prepare for the bad things that could happen tomorrow.  Because of that, here are a few ways to protect your online accounts from hacking.

The improvements in technology have brought us instantaneous communication with people around the globe as well as faster and easier ways to pay bills, start businesses, and complete tasks. But with this, comes the problem of security.  There are some ways that you can protect yourself, and prepare in advance for a possible hacking of your accounts.

Food storage tips: How much food and water do you need to survive for 3 months?

0

by Zoey Sky, Natural News:

Food storage is an important aspect of prepping. When SHTF, your life will be much easier if you have at least three months’ worth of shelf-stable food in your survival stockpile. (h/t to AskAPrepper.com)

But what if you’re on a budget, and you want to store the bare minimum food supply to keep your family well-fed during a long-term disaster scenario?

Following a “bare minimum diet” is also ideal if you need to store only the essentials at a bug-out location with limited storage space. (Related: Food storage tips: Considerations for making the most out of your food prepping budget.)