FAA ALERTS AND AIR INCIDENTS AND THE YOU-KNOW-WHATS

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    by Joseph P. Farrell, Giza Death Star:

    Those who know me well know that I have this love-hate relationship with flying. In fact, the last time I was on an airplane was in 1986, coming back from the United Kingdom where I had just finished my doctorate and was gearing up for the final rewrite and submission. I vowed then and there never to set foot on nor travel by airplane again, and I haven’t and won’t. I’m just one of those people that is afraid of the whole danged process, and all those arguments about it being statistically the safest way to travel fall on my very unsympathetic ears. Suffice it to say my experience with flying has been less-than-optimistic, and I’ll be happy to recount those experiences for anyone willing to listen to them. I have a couple of friends who are instrument rated pilots, and they haven’t convinced me, either. Yet, I cannot avoid being fascinated by all the things that pilots or air traffic controllers must know and be able to do, flawlessly, time after time.

    TRUTH LIVES on at https://sgtreport.tv/

    One of the things that one of them told me about was the sudden rise of very strange post-planscamdemic conversations making their appearance on youtube, of cockpit-to-Air traffic control conversations. I listened to one of these involving a Canadian commercial jet flying into LaGuardia in New York City, and it was like a badly written script from one of those 1970s – 1980s era disaster movies. More to the point, it was more like the comedy send-up of such movies, Airplane, but without the comedy. The conversation was about ten minutes long, and the pilot of the airliner was trying to declare an emergency landing because one of his engines had apparently flamed out and he was unable to get it restarted. The air traffic controller, as a response to this, was trying to “vector” the aircraft to a landing in Newark, New Jersey, and not LaGuardia. The back-and-forth  between the pilot and the air traffic controller was almost surreal, since neither party seemed capable of even understanding the other.

    Fast forward to today. There are increasing reports of in-flight medical emergencies involving the cockpit crew, and most recently, a spate of “incidents” on runways. Here’s a sample of the former:

    Off-Duty Pilot Enters Southwest Cockpit To Help After Pilot Suffers Medical Emergency

    Consider what happened during this incident:

    “The captain became incapacitated while enroute. He’s in the back of the aircraft right now with a flight attendant, but we need to get him on an ambulance immediately,” said a crew member in a communication to air traffic control, according to LiveATC.net.

    A nurse who happened to also be onboard helped care for the pilot, the airline said, adding “It’s standard procedure for our Flight Crews to request assistance from traveling medical personnel during in-flight medical events involving Customers, this situation just so happened to involve one of our Employees.”

    Now you may recall that Southwest was one of those airlines that tried mandating the planscamdemic injections for its employees, and that its pilots launched a huge backlash against the plan. You’ll notice a distinct lack of detail therefore about what, exactly, caused the pilot of this flight to “become incapacitated” while in flight to the extent that another pilot who was fortunately travelling on the flight was able to lend assistance to the co-pilot in the cockpit.

    Nothing to see here, folks, move along…

    …except I’m willing to ask that unasked and unanswered question, which I wager pretty much everyone reading this blog is already thinking: What was the planscamdemic injection status of the pilot?

    Then we’ve also seen or heard about a rash of incidents on runways and taxiways, and some disturbing near misses.  I found the following story on CNN:

    FAA issues industrywide call to action following runway close calls

    In this article, I draw your attention to the following final paragraphs:

    One report of a close call on a US runway involving a commercial airliner has only recently come to light.

    An airliner and emergency vehicle came less than a football field’s length away from colliding on a runway at the Baltimore airport earlier this year, according to an FAA report.

    The National Transportation Safety Board told CNN it is not investigating this incident.

    The FAA determined the emergency vehicle crossed a runway at the Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport on January 12 without air traffic controller permission.

    An FAA incident report says the driver of the vehicle read back incorrect instructions to the controller but that the controller “did not catch the incorrect read-back.” The report classifies the incident as category B, which is considered less severe than category A incidents. (Emphasis added)

    This confusion is exactly the type of thing that I heard in my youtube listen of the cockpit-to-air traffic control conversation of the Canadian flight coming into La Guardia: confusion, brain “fog”, lack of communication and understanding.  And like the Zero Hedge article, the unasked question – it’s CNN so of course the question goes unasked – what was the injection status of those involved in the runway incidents?

    Again, I suspect that most readers here already have their suspicions about what may be going on. And it may or may not be going on, but we will never know, until we ask, and voice, the question. 

    The sad fact is that in their rush to approve the planscamdemic narrative and to follow “The Scientism” and “Mr. Scientism” (Dr. Fausti), they vilified those who refused the injections. Now, as adverse reactions pile up, and lawsuits loom, eventually the demand will come that people know the injection status of those flying their flights, or who are parts of the cabin crew, or driving the locomotives, or crewing the dispatch railyard, or driving their busses or taxicabs. And sadly, those who took those injections in good faith stand in danger of being equally vilified. There are people responsible for this mess, but they’re not in the cockpits or radar rooms. They’re in the board rooms and laboratories that concocted these witches’ brews.

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