6,000 Gallons to Put Out Spontaneously Igniting Tesla

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    from Moonbattery:

    In case social engineers really do manage to force us into unaffordable and unreliable electric cars, now would be a good time to invest in fire-retardant clothing. The clothing had better be water-resistant too:

    A Tesla Model S “spontaneously” burst into flames Saturday afternoon in California while driving on a freeway, officials said. …

    Fire officials said the vehicle was traveling “freeway speeds” when the sudden combustion occurred and that “nothing unusual” happened prior to the fire. …

    TRUTH LIVES on at https://sgtreport.tv/

    Firefighters used about 6,000 gallons of water to extinguish the flames as the Tesla’s battery cells continued to combust.

    Meanwhile, moonbats want us to eat seaweed because it will supposedly save a little water, which the world is running out of, according to their ideology.

    It can take tens of thousands of gallons to put out the fire after EVs spontaneously ignite. The fires are hotter than normal engine fires and difficult to extinguish with traditional methods. Then they might spontaneously reignite a few days later, due to latent heat, like a trick birthday candle coming back to life after you blow it out.

    EVs may cost a lot more than real cars, but at least you can make some of the money back because they are cheaper to fuel, right? Wrong:

    “In Q4 2022, typical mid-priced ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) car drivers paid about $11.29 to fuel their vehicles for 100 miles of driving. That cost was around $0.31 cheaper than the amount paid by mid-priced EV drivers charging mostly at home, and over $3 less than the cost borne by comparable EV drivers charging commercially,” Anderson Economic Group (AEG) said in an analysis.

    We are down to one reason to drive an electric vehicle: sheer moonbattery. If they made any sense, Big Government would not need to bribe people to buy them with other people’s money.

    On tips from Anonymous, Steve T, Wiggins, Chuck A, and Chris Neilson.

    Read More @ Moonbattery.com