Blackout: How You Can Act Decisively If an EMP Strikes at Work

by Jeremiah Johnson, Ready Nutrition:

ReadyNutrition Readers, this is Part 2 of a 3-part series dealing with immediate actions to be taken in the event of an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack.  You can read Part 1 here. In the last segment, we covered what you should do if you’re on the road heading to or from work, or traveling.  Now we are going to detail some actions and preparations for your workplace.  Keep in mind: there will be a “blending” of these parts in actual practice, as to move from one locale to another, you will use the information presented in Part 1 when traveling.  All the parts should complement one another.

I also think it would be a good idea to take listed items and burn off an extra copy as a form of a “checklist,” as not many people have perfect memories (myself included), and it could help you out in the time of trouble and eliminate the need for guesswork.  Let’s start off with a scenario.

Let’s start off with a scenario.

You are an office worker in Anytown, a small midwestern city who works in a 7-story building located on the eastern 1/3 of the town.  The direction of your home from work is toward the East.  You are sitting at your desk with a window facing the west, and it’s about 10:00 am.  Suddenly, a flash of light catches your attention in the sky, and then it disappears.  Simultaneously, all the lights in the office go out, as does your desk computer.  No backup lights come on.  You look at your watch, and it’s dead.  You pick up your desk phone, and there is no dial tone.  There are murmurings from coworkers, and people are shuffling into an open area with a conference table.  You have just been hit by an EMP attack, and it appears that you have already punched out early, and probably for good.

The scenario will be played out throughout the United States.  Now is the time to act. Those who are preparedness minded must keep this in mind: Definitive action taken at the critical point is critical to your survival.

10 Emergency Items to Have in Your Workplace

I have written articles similar in nature to this subject that you may wish to peruse.  What is on your person?  In your desk?  In a locker (if you have one) on the premises?  Let us examine some of the items it would be beneficial to have on your person at all times:

  1. Flashlight (with extra batteries)
  2. Watch (that will not be affected by an EMP or need batteries)
  3. Leatherman/Gerber multi-tool
  4. A good folding knife with a locking blade
  5. Matches and/or a lighter
  6. Some type of firearm for your defense with ammunition for it… (Note: this is, to paraphrase Alice in Chains, Your Decision…you will have to weigh your options)
  7. Pen and writing paper/note cards
  8. Transistor radio that works with a battery and an earphone-attachment
  9. Having an NBC gas mask and anti-radiation pills in your workplace could be a lifesaver if an EMP may be followed by radiological and nuclear consequences.

Flashlights

You are going to need a light source if battery-powered lights do not switch on and there isn’t any backup power source.  That small Maglite in your pocket may do the trick: the simplest of circuits will probably be safe and still working…a flashlight is one of them.  All the rest of the items are self-explanatory, except for the pen and writing paper.  These you’ll need to either make calculations, leave a note for someone, or copy any kind of relevant information that you may find.

Transistor Radios

Regarding the transistor radio, you will want to see if you can hear any kind of emergency information that you may be able to use.  The earphone/ear-buds you want to have for OPSEC…you don’t need to advertise that you have a radio.  More.  You don’t want anyone to hear where you are or give away your position with the noise from a radio.

Emergency Exits

Now, in previous articles, I had recommended walking the route and counting the steps from your desk to your vehicle, or from your desk to the front street, if you don’t have vehicle parking in your building.  You’ll have to do it in the dark, and you want to prepare as much as possible for this.  You’ll be taking the stairs.  You should be able to estimate how long this will take you.  Speed is of the essence.

Workplace Gear

Now, what’s in your desk?  You will either want to have a small bag with you with some dried food, a small first-aid kit, and some essentials.  Maybe a couple bottles of water and a few canned meals (prepared meals are the best…focus on high protein and high carbs…you’ll be burning all of it off with the energy expended.)  There should be some room in the bag, because also, you’ll want to change (if you’re not already wearing them) into good boots/hiking shoes, and a good set of clothes instead of the Happy Western Consumer Clown Suit of tan pants, loafers, button-down shirt, ad infinitum, in all the ensemble’s color variances.  DX’em (that means get rid of them) …. you won’t need them anymore.  They’re not worth the weight to carry.

Move quickly and with a purpose: your mission to leave the building without incident and without fanfare.  Your vehicle?  If it doesn’t start, and its electronics have been “fried” by the pulse…then salvage that “go/bug-out” bag from the trunk, along with any weapons and equipment you packed.  Food and water, medical equipment, and prepositioned supplies…tote as much of it as you can.  This is where a large rucksack (or Alice pack) comes in handy, as it can take the weight, take a beating, and hold a ton of stuff.

For a long-gun, I strongly recommend a scabbard-sheath that will enable you to reach up and grab it, while keeping it sheathed.  You’ll be relying on your sidearm, hopefully, a semiautomatic pistol or a powerful revolver of some type.  Get your stuff, get it up on your back, and get out.

There will probably be vending machines in your building.  There won’t be electricity, even if you have coins or bills.  On the other hand, a backup power system may kick in.  You may wish to pick up as many dried/packaged goods as possible.  Just remember this: on the Day After Doomsday, there will be no more of those packaged goodies.

To paraphrase Jack London, the “law of club and fang” just emerged as the new norm for society.  As you leave the building, you need to have several points where you can rest or take refuge.  You should have already planned these out in advance, as well as the route you will be taking.  This route must also take into consideration any rally points for the family, points for resupply (food, water, and medical supplies), and places you may need to shelter in for more than a few days.

Success regarding this segment will completely depend on what you have planned for in advance and either stashed in your now-defunct vehicle or at work.  Good intel is the key to making it through this one.  You’ll have to consider sections of the city/town where you work you must “traverse” through, such as a “bad” area with gang or criminal activity, or such.  For those with the ’67 Mustang Convertible or the ’54 Ford pickup who have working vehicles, then refer to Part 1, and get out of that town as quickly as you can.  If you’re on foot, also refer to Part 1 for techniques, such as traveling when it’s dark, if possible, and things to look for/avoid on your way.  Stay in that good fight!  

Ready More @ ReadyNutrition.com