Saturday, July 20, 2019

Long-Term Disaster Training: A Primer on Prepping Your Body

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by Tess Penington, Ready Nutrition:

All the readers at ReadyNutrition know how much emphasis and importance I have placed on physical conditioning and training as part of your preps.  You need to take care of your body and mind.  Exercise and nutrition are critical for you.  I believe that I have emphasized this repeatedly and that they both go together.  So, what’s this?  What is new about this article?  I’m going to mention some areas of the body, and present some technical terms to stimulate your further research.  Let’s go in order.

The Brain

Exercise helps to increase the circulation in the brain by 30{5f621241b214ad2ec6cd4f506191303eb2f57539ef282de243c880c2b328a528}.  That’s an impressive figure.  This helps with the way the brain synthesizes glucose and utilizes oxygen.  A strong, healthy brain is very important for your mental and physical functions.  The brain has many chemicals that are important.  Some it produces on its own, and others it synthesizes from nutrients taken in.

  1. Endorphins: a natural pain-killer produced by the brain, especially in times of stress or physical exertion. Laughter also releases endorphins.  This substance is more powerful than morphine.
  2. Serotonin: has effects that change the mood. Lower levels can lead to depression.
  3. Cholecystokinin: is a hormone that governs appetite. Deficiency in this hormone can lead to insatiable feelings and overeating.

A well-balanced diet with plenty of iron and B vitamins are key to maintaining good brain health.

The Body

You need to look at yourself as an athlete in training.  What are you training for?  You are training to survive…in a “marathon” of when the grid goes down and the SHTF.  When it happens, don’t kid yourself…the society as you know it is not coming back anytime soon, if even within your lifetime.  Now is the time to prepare your body.  Let’s review some substances we have talked about before that are crucial to your athletic and physical performance.

  1. Glycogen: is a form of glucose (your body’s fuel) that is stored in both the muscles and the liver. It is released in the form of glucose in times of high energy activity and when your body needs it.  Exercise is one of those times.  Glycogen is especially used at times when the energy exerted is short to medium term needing high amounts of strength.
  2. Oxidative Systems: this is for long-term and endurance challenges. This is where oxygen works upon the protein, glucose, and fatty acid chains in a process known as oxidation.  These substances then generate energy.  Oxygen intake is the key factor in this phase.
  3. Amino Acids: the “building blocks” for all your protein and tissue repair. We covered these extensively in previous articles.  Protein intake of high-quality meats, poultry, seafood, and protein powder is a must for success in this department.

Protein consumption needs to be high in either of the two phases of exercise (short-term, or long-term/endurance activities).  What is needed is a balanced nutritional intake of protein and carbohydrates, as lean as possible to enable efficient recovery and tissue repair without gaining unnecessary weight from the fat.

This is where your planning comes into play, depending on what type of discipline you follow.  I lift weights and follow power training in all of my endeavors.  Many of you are distance runners.  You must gear your meals and intake to correspond with these accordingly.  Do not forget what I mentioned in other articles about anabolism and catabolism.  These two phases are muscle growth and muscle breakdown, respectively.

In order to effectively prevent “cannibalism,” that is the conversion by your depleted body of muscle protein into glycogen…you must consume protein and carbohydrates within 20 to 30 minutes after your workout.

I also told you that (barring introduction of supplements with protein and carbs at mid-workout) you should keep your workouts between 45 minutes to 1-hour maximum.

Do not forget winter chores “count” as workout time if they involve strenuous physical activity!  That wood-chopping and snow-shoveling are just as good as a workout…and in some instances more difficult and/or better!  The reason I’m writing these articles now is a good one:

The winter hasn’t begun: you need to be into a routine to avoid the complacency normally striking during the winter, and the added “distraction” of the holidays, a “crippler” for the midsection.

I receive dozens of e-mails in the spring, asking “JJ, what kind of program should I start with to get rid of all my excess weight?”  I do feel for these people; however, the best type of medicine is the medicine taken preventatively….to keep that condition from occurring.

Read More @ ReadyNutrition.com

Why Prepping and Current Events are Inextricably Entwined

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by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

I’ve gotten a few comments lately asking why I write about current events. I’ve gotten every variation from “I follow you for prepping information. Why is there so much news on your website?” to “You’re an idiot. Why don’t you stick to canning?”

Before I hurry back to the kitchen where I belong, there’s a short answer and a long answer. Here’s the short one: Prepping and current events are inextricably entwined.”

If you only wanted the short answer, there you have it. Thanks for stopping by.

The long answer is more involved. If you’re anything like me, you’ve also tried in vain to explain this to folks who just don’t get it.

We need to know what is happening in the world around us.

If we don’t realize that St. Louis is erupting with violent protests, we may stumble into a dangerous situation. If we don’t understand that the Antifa communists are planning sedition beginning on November 4th, we may not be prepared to hunker down and avoid the chaos. If we aren’t aware that there is a retail apocalypse going on, we may be totally stunned when the economy all comes crashing down.

It’s essential that we pay attention to the world around us because it is just a larger form of situational awareness. While those who live on a secluded mountaintop and never venture down to a town larger than 3000 people may not need to plan around current events, most of us do not live these lives of perfect isolation. We go to doctor’s appointments in large cities. We take vacations. We run errands and go shopping and work in town. We attend the theater and go to concerts. We need to know what’s going on. We need to know the trends of civil unrest and whether a controversial verdict is about to be handed down.

Most of us don’t live in a safe bubble of our own making, and our awareness can help us be better prepared to avoid or deal with bad things.

Even if you hate politics, it pays to know what’s going on.

Many people avoid politics like a contagious disease. I agree completely that it’s all showmanship and that nearly all politicians are completely untrustworthy. That doesn’t mean I think they can be ignored though.

The policies being made in Washington DC can affect us all, by parting us from more of our money or chipping away at our freedom. For example, if you knew that guns were going to be banned tomorrow, would it change what you do today? War is made by politicians, not by soldiers. They’ll get rich while we get poor and our children get killed. These are the thing we need to know. We need to understand WHY war is a racket, why Wall Street gets bailed out, and why health care we don’t want is getting forced on us.

The people in office are making decisions that affect us all, whether we’d like to ignore them or not.

We can learn so much about preparedness by studying actual events.

Perhaps the most important reason that prepping and current events are inextricably linked is that the analysis of an event can be incredibly educational. Those of us with preparedness mentalities do this naturally. We think about what we’d do if we were in a situation that has occurred. We see what shortages have befallen people after an event and we adjust our preps accordingly. We watch the inevitable patterns so that we can predict what may happen next if one day we are in an emergency situation.

Here are a few examples.

Read More @ TheOrganicPrepper.ca

Every Prepper Should Have Multiple Bug-Out Bags. Here’s Why.

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by Jeremiah Johnson, Ready Nutrition:

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we have covered the “Go” Bag, aka the “Bugout” Bag on numerous occasions.  We’re going to cover three areas: Duplication, Synchronization, and Maintenance.  This is to promote efficiency, and also to allow for recovery and use if one of the bags or more is compromised.  Let’s get started.

The word for the day is Redundancy.  This word is usually something that connotates a “boring” or “mindless” repetition, almost in a drone-like fashion.  In this case, that definition does not suffice.  Redundancy in our usage is the repetition to promote a good follow-through in the event of seizure/theft of your goods so that you have a backup plan and can continue to march.  You want to put together as many bags as are in as many locales as you frequent in the course of the day.  Here are some locations, for starters:

  1. Your home
  2. Your vehicle
  3. Your workplace

Surely this can be added to, but the logic is in these examples.  If you are in your home, and disaster strikes and your vehicle is stolen…you have a bag in your home.  If you are at work, and the vehicle is stolen, you should have a bag at work.  The key is to make them light enough so that you can strap them together (bungees or cargo straps) and take both bags without killing yourself.

We have already covered lists ad infinitum, so we’re just going to mention the bullets, beans, band-aids (the 3 “B’s”that need to be in your bags.  Let’s jump into the terms.

Duplication: this means that your bags need to be the same…John Smith’s bag in his car, home, and vehicle need to contain the same things…and all of these things in the same location with an inventory sheet for each bag (as covered in other articles).  John Smith will then know (overall) what he has, and that he has one bag with each of those items at home, in his vehicle, and in his workplace.

Synchronization: this means to keep the bags as “uniform” as possible for all the family members.  The same amounts of food, water purification gear, and so forth.  Differences will arrive with regard to ammunition.  Mr. Smith may carry a Desert Eagle .44 Magnum pistol, where Mrs. Smith may carry a Ruger SP-101 in .357 Magnum.  Guess what?  There needs to be a box of Mrs. Smith’s ammo in Mr. Smith’s bags, and vice-versa.  Similar gear packed in a similar manner other than that.  What will this do?  Promote effectiveness.  Mrs. Smith then knows that if all her bags are compromised, she can use one of Mr. Smith’s bags and be familiar with its contents.

Maintenance: well, this goes beyond just simple cleaning maintenance.  This is also a maintenance of familiarization.  What this entails is unpacking the bags, checking the contents for accountability and serviceability, and then repacking them.  Sound boring?  It is, but the alternative is to be unfamiliar with your equipment and then fumble around with it in the dark…only to find that it is incomplete.  You need to be able to take the bag apart in the dark, in less than ideal conditions.  So many people have all of the ducats to spend on beaucoup equipment…and then they just set it off in a shed or a corner, and ignore it for years at a time.  That’s not the way, except the way to fail.  You should practice all of this at least once a week for a few hours at a time until you are proficient with all of the equipment and locations.

Preparing is not just a bunch of supplies.  It is a posture.  It is a state of mind and one that you have to be continuously on your toes and on your game.  By doing these things with your bags, you reduce the chances of failure when you have to perform.  You also reduce the risks of losing your supplies to marauders (usually your friendly neighbors on Sesame Street) and other assorted creeps.  Use these techniques to increase your efficiency and better your performance, making you readier on the day the “S” hits the fan. 

Read More @ ReadyNutrition.com

Beretta APX 9mm Handgun, by Pat Cascio

by Pat Cascio, Survival Blog:

The new Beretta APX 9mm handgun is a hot seller, and it’s the subject of our review in this article. No other handgun has fit my hand better than the grand old Browning Hi-Power 9mm pistol, and I’m not alone in this feeling, either. I’ve heard the same thing over and over again from folks who own a Hi-Power. Well, all of that changed the moment I picked-up the new Beretta APX 9mm handgun. I have never, and I mean never, had a handgun feel so good in my hand, no exceptions! I just had to get that out of the way at the onset of this review.

SurvivalBlog First to Review U.S. Military Adopted SIG Sauer P320 9mm

As many readers know, the U.S. Army, and now all the other military services, have adopted the SIG Sauer P320 9mm handgun. SurvivalBlog was the first to review this outstanding handgun. We often get the jump on others with new product reviews. I own the SIG P320 Compact model and love it. The competition for a new U.S. military service handgun had many competitors. However, in the end, the SIG was the winner. Needless to say, there were sour grapes from some other competitors, and the usual lawsuits were filed, though they have been dismissed. Beretta modified their outstanding current military issue handgun and called it the Model 93A3. I don’t understand Beretta’s thinking. It really wasn’t a “modular” handgun, and that is what the U.S. Army was looking for. Though there’s nothing wrong with the new Model 93A3.

Beretta’s APX Might Have Beat SIG Sauer P320

Now, if Beretta had entered the APX in the competition, it may have well beat out the SIG Sauer P320. I kid you not. It is “that” good of a 9mm handgun. However, the APX wasn’t manufactured in time to enter the testing, which is too bad. It would have been an outstanding contender against all comers. I’m sure of it. BTW, the APX is also available in .40 S&W. However, since the FBI switched from the .40 caliber and back to 9mm because of improved bullet designs and stopping power, numerous law enforcement agencies are doing the same and dumping the .40 S&W. Now everyone is looking at the APX in 9mm over the .40 S&W.

Beretta APX Barrel and Frame

The APX has a 4.25-inch barrel, which is a nice length for duty carry. There is the polymer black frame, and the slide is also black with slide grasping grooves from the front to the back of the frame on both sides. This is another outstanding feature that I love. The magazines (and you get two) hold 17 rounds, and this is my only source of contention. The magazines are extremely difficult to fully load with 17 rounds, even with the outstanding Butler Creek ASAP magazine loader. That last round is a bear to get into the magazine. The slide has the three dot system, and the front white dot is a little bit larger than the two white dots on the rear sight. The system is very fast to pick up under stress. Of course, as is the trend, the APX is striker-fired. The unloaded gun weighs in a 28.24 ounces, which is about par compared to other polymer framed handguns.

APX Disassembly

There is a button you can press with a pointed object or tool on the right side of the frame that deactivates the striker, so you can safely disassemble the APX without pulling the trigger. However, it is a little bit of pain to do this. So, I simply racked the slide to make sure the chamber is empty and then pull the trigger to deactivate the striker. Then, I press the slide release button, which is stout, on the right side of the frame and turn the take-down lever on the opposite of the frame. The slide then comes off. It’s easier done than said but very Beretta Model 92 in design.

APX Grip and Backstraps

The grip frame can be replaced. You can do that by removing the serialized chassis from inside the frame, very much like that of the SIG Sauer P320. So, the chassis is actually the “firearm”, because it carries the serial number. There is an ambidextrous slide release/stop on either side of the frame. Also, there is a trigger stop lever built into the trigger itself, so there is no trigger over-travel when the gun is fired, in theory, making the gun a bit more accurate. You can also change out the backstraps. Several backstraps come with the gun, however it is tedious to change them out, and I don’t see people swapping out the backstraps on a regular basis.

The backstrap on my sample, which I purchased out of my own funds, fit my hand perfectly. The magazine release is switchable from side to side, so it’s not ambidextrous, but it’s easy to change from one side to the other. The frame has the Picatinny-style rail for installing lights and/or lasers, too. The texturing on the frame is also perfect. It grips you but isn’t overly aggressive, which is another outstanding feature I like on the APX. The front of the trigger guard is squared off without serrations on it; they’re not needed. No one wraps the finger of their off-hand around the trigger guard these days. (It was very popular at one time, for some reason.)

Seventeen-Round Mags

The above is quite a lot of features on the new Beretta APX 9mm handgun, and there isn’t anything I would do away with. However, I would sure love it if the 17-rd mags were a little easier to load. I rarely have to use a magazine loader, as I have been loading hi-cap mags for many years with just my hands. But the last round is difficult to get into the APX mags. Even after I loaded them and let them sit for several weeks and emptied the mags. Then, during target practice when I went to reload them, nope, I still found it hard to get that last round into the mag. Yet, the mags easily seat when loading them into the APX.

Read More @ SurvivalBlog.com

Optics for your Rifle: Cover All the Basics

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by Jeremiah Johnson, Ready Nutrition:

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, prior to hunting season and/or disaster, those rifles of yours need to be ready to go…cleaned and in peak operating condition.  Thinking of the rifle as an extension of yourself is a good rule to follow that will keep you on your toes regarding maintenance and maintaining skills.  This piece is not intended to recommend any particular type of optic, as needs are widely varied in terms of rifles used and the tasks those rifles are intended to perform.  For a “Happy Family Scope Primer,” talk to a salesman at Cabela’s or some other big-box store selling the equipment.

This piece is designed to place emphasis on one of the concepts I’ve been trying to hammer home in almost every article: Master the “primitive” before you employ the technological.

Your first emphasis should be on iron sights and Kentucky windage.  You must be able to hit your target without optics.  OK, you have a perfectly-zeroed scope.  What if it breaks off its mount or one of the objectives shatters?  Oops, can you wait for Mr. Bad-Guy, so that I can aim?  How about an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse), and suddenly that $10-grand thermal image optical “dancer” on top of your weapon becomes a paperweight…what then?

Hopefully (in that regard) you listened to my advice and bought a second one and clapped it into a Faraday cage just for that event.  Either way, you will need that iron sight for a time…until that Carrington Effect wears off.  Same precautions need to be followed regarding your Red Dot sights and any laser sights or lights you may be employing.

Work with your rifle for at least a week or two with the iron sights.  Learn how to adjust them (if they’re adjustable) and how to estimate your ranges.  Find your optimal range to hit that target…the range you are comfortable with.  It will vary with age, eye-strength, experience, and natural shooting ability.  For example, one man may have an easy time with a man-sized target at 100 meters (300 feet), whereas a second man engages it effectively at 50 meters.  This is not to make any judgments on either man, but to emphasize a point: know your abilities and your limitations.  In this manner, you will be more effective.

Standard scopes with non-electrical/laser objectives (just lenses in a tube!) vary in quality and price.  Stick with this motto: Cheap you buy, cheap you get.  Although not perfect grammatically, it emphasizes the point clearly.  Quality in terms of durability, lens clarity and craftsmanship, and simplicity of function are things to seek after.  Take the time to really test out the scope.  The “gun salesman” is out to make bottom line and commission by selling guns and accessories.  Every scope is good… yada, yada.  Want to make a good selection?

Find someone with military experience as a sniper and ask this individual to either make a recommendation or go with you to pick up a good scope that fits your weapon’s needs.  Give ‘em the standard: “Thank you for your service.”  Great.  Then pay him to show you the knowledge that he earned…at a price.

It is a life or death decision, and if it’s not in your mind?  You better make it so.  If it’s hunting, it’s to provide meat for your table and your family.  You can’t get more life or death than that…except for defense.  When the goon is coming up the driveway with a pistol after the EMP strikes…you need to drop him before he ever reaches the door.

Once you have the scope, zero it properly.  You will have to set goals for yourself.  You will have to invest the time and the ammo.  Save your brass, reload, and determine your needs with the proper ballistics and bullet tables.  That scope…once it’s mounted, it needs to not move.  A boresight laser is invaluable: not so much for zeroing, but for confirming your zero and that you’re still “on” if you move the weapon or touch it.  Every time you touch that scope, you’ll have to re-zero it or re-confirm the zero.  Now, there are a ton of durable scopes and mounts that need minimal work in these departments.  It’s up to you to find them for your weapon and apply them.

Then, to the high-tech stuff.  As I said, you can invest tens of thousands in this department.  For those of you who think I just visit the “Dollar Tree,” think again: that was recommended for those who simply cannot afford to purchase the best equipment.  I give you my stance on scopes in a nutshell: only the best will suffice, in all departments as merits a professional soldier.  Rest assured, my optics are the best, and following OPSEC, I will not reveal to you what I have.

Read More @ ReadyNutrition.com

You Are Either A Prepper Or A Future Victim

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by Tom Chatham, via Alt-Market:

The recent disasters around the world have shown most people are ill prepared for sudden disruptions to normal life. Just as there was a lack of imagination that allowed 9/11 to happen, the population suffers from a lack of imagination that allows them to suffer from sudden occurrences. Survival favors the prepared mind.

Simply having supplies piled up in preparation for some occurrence is not enough to insure your survival. There are several other things you must keep in mind and balance out among your preparations.

You must imagine the potential catastrophic possibilities
You must prepare yourself mentally to deal with whatever happens
You must have knowledge of how best to employ your resources
You need to use your imagination to think outside the box
You must be able to improvise, adapt and overcome obstacles
You must have a flexible plan to guide you

Many people have spewed hateful rhetoric at preppers over the years and today some are finding themselves in dire circumstances as infrastructure and supplies are cut off for an indefinite period of time. Those unprepared individuals have few options and now rely on the actions of others to insure their survival.

As many in the Caribbean can now attest to, having to wait for help to come from hundreds or even thousands of miles away is slow and stressful to those who wait. They do not know when help will arrive and what resources will be available when they arrive. It could take years for many locations to return to some type of normalcy and this is at a time when help is available and forthcoming. What happens when that help is not available following an event?

In the world we now live in the bulk of the population is conditioned to wait for help to come. They are not encouraged to perform self help to minimize their suffering. This leads to many more victims to deal with overloading services and resources available to the public. This is happening in good times. What happens when things deteriorate and no help is available to communities or cities? What will happen when people and equipment do not come because damage is wide scale? What happens when all expendable resources are exhausted and cannot be replaced?

Preppers already know the answers to those questions and that is why they prepare. They know that someday an event could happen where no help will be available and they will be on their own for weeks or months. They know if something happens, what they have on hand is all they will likely have to work with for the duration. They know those that have not planned will be victims and most will expect someone to help them and their family. This creates a difficult situation for preppers and victims alike.

The act of learned helplessness is the only thing many people know today and that will lead to a reduced chance of survival for many depending on the depth of the event. A prepper can only do so much to help others in this type of situation but the main thing they possess are the leadership qualities and survival skills the masses need to come through the situation.

Following an event there will be a certain number of survivors that will see the light and understand what preppers have been trying to tell them for years. These people will differ from those that will still have the entitlement mentality and expect others to care for them and provide resources they need. These newly enlightened individuals are the ones that preppers will be able to help the most.

The true leaders in society will be able to direct these individuals on courses of action that will allow them to slowly recover and build up some resilience over time. These are the actions that will be necessary to reduce the chaos in society and provide some stabilization. These people will help provide a buffer between preppers and the hostile unprepared masses that manage to survive.

Make no mistake about it. There will be groups with varying mindsets roaming about following an event and it is advantageous to have as many of them on your side as possible. There is little you can do about the entitled victims except defend against their actions. In this case, there will be safety in numbers.

While a prepper cannot foresee every problem, they can plan ahead and set aside some resources that can help solidify your leadership among those you are able to work with. This could take the form of setting aside a few drums of bulk grains like oats or beans that can be purchased cheaply now but will allow you to feed a small group of people a basic meal for several weeks. The small price of a few drums of grain could buy a lot of goodwill.

Being able to provide clean drinking water to a small group by purchasing a good spare water filter will help eliminate the spread of disease among the group. Having a few medications that can help a few individuals that do manage to become sick will mean a lot to their families. Having a few extra radios that the group can share will help with security for everyone. Having a means to provide a small power source for lighting or battery recharging could mean a great deal to those with no power. In some locations having an extra wood stove to share and some wood will provide these people with heat and cooking ability.

Read More @ Alt-Market.com

« Preparedness Notes for Sunday – October 01, 2017Letter: The Three Greatest Threats To Our Mutual Survival » Essential Survival Tips From A Hurricane Irma Survivor, by C.S.

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by Hugh James Latimer, Survival Blog:

At the time I began writing this, Hurricane Irma had hit only eight days earlier. From it and other hurricane experiences, I have learned some valuable lessons. The first is, use your head. No, do not use it to hammer the shutters down. What I mean is, use some common sense.

Demonstrating a Lack of Reasoning

Here are some things that happened here in South Florida that demonstrated a lack of reasoning:

  • A guy burned down his house because he wasn’t careful while pouring gas in his generator that was running. The spillage later caught on fire, torching his entire hacienda.
  • My girlfriend forgot to take a shower right before the hurricane hit. On the fifth day without water or a bath, she sprayed Febreze all over her body. She’s now waiting for recovery from the repercussions of that move.
  • A guy waited until the last minute to put his hurricane shutters up on the second floor. The wind gusts blew over the ladder, and he died.
  • People spent lots of money on huge amounts of bottled water and then discovered they had no food.
  • Many people stayed in the Keys. They stayed even after they were ordered to evacuate.
  • I saw this guy on the news looking for shells in the Tampa Bay, where the water had just been sucked out to sea.

Common Sense Survival Tips

  • Don’t wait until the last minute to leave town, because there’s going to be a million other people doing the same thing. Three days before is pretty good, preferably in the middle of the night.
  • Make sure you have a paper map in your car. Do you know, those old-fashioned pieces of paper with different colored lines printed on them? Newsflash: Your GPS won’t get you anywhere when the cell phones don’t work.
  • Cell phones do not work after a hurricane, even if you have battery. Text messages will work, though I’m not sure why.
  • Don’t put “big Xs” of masking tape on your windows. Not only will it look stupid but you won’t be able to get it off when the sun bakes the adhesive to the window. It won’t help to prevent your windows from blowing out.
  • Get an off-road SUV that carries stuff. You can’t get much of what you expect to ever own again in a Mini-Cooper. Plus, with millions of people on the same road, you may need to do some creative driving.
  • Take the back roads. Use your paper map. Sleep in the day. Drive during the night. Do the opposite of what everyone else is doing.
  • Don’t stay in a mobile home. It’s literally like standing outside during the hurricane.
  • Don’t wait until the last minute to get gas. Many people waited in line for the whole day and got nothing.
  • You don’t need a million paper towels. Use real towels. You can actually hand wash them in tap water!
  • Baby wipes are good alternatives to showers.
  • Don’t buy bottled water and then throw empty plastic jugs out to the street. Save all plastic bottles and put water in them. Freeze the bottles and turn your refrigerator into a cooler. This will save you from frantically going out to look for more bottled water or buying ice and then complaining you have no money.
  • Don’t run the generator in your house. You’ll fall asleep and never wake up. It’s called carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Don’t open your windows during a hurricane, thinking you need a breeze to break the humidity or that you need to let the house “breathe” or relieve pressure. Doing so will result in a panoramic sky-view of the storm, as your roof will fly off.
  • Turn your air conditioning down to as cold as possible, a couple of days before you lose power. It takes that long to get super cold. Then when you lose power, it will take a couple of days to get back to normal. This way you don’t die of heat exhaustion on day one.
  • Feeling too cold? Suit up! Drag out those winter sweatshirts and sweatpants. Wear layers, baby. It’s the style!
  • Your power is more likely to go out than the water pipes breaking.
  • Don’t drive in water where you can’t see the bottom. Not only may you anger some alligators but your car could get stuck in the water. The alligators may then eat you. Or, you could just sit on the roof of your car for a week until the water subsides. Ditto to snakes.
  • After the storm, don’t open your door to anyone who says they are FEMA or the electric company. They will stick a gun in your face and then it’ll be “bye-bye” to all your stuff that the hurricane didn’t take.
  • Don’t go walking in puddles after the storm. Water is conductive of electricity, and power lines are down all over the place. ZAP!

Past Florida Hurricanes, Like Andrew

I have been through a few hurricanes here in Florida. However, for me, this one was the mother of all. I was in Miami’s Hurricane Andrew in the outer bands but was allowed into the worst damaged area right after the storm. This was the case because my husband was an insurance adjuster.

He was not a homeowner’s insurance adjuster but an automobile claims adjuster. However, the insurance companies were so desperate for insurance adjusters that if you had an insurance license for anything, you were told to strap a ladder to your car roof and go into the belly of the beast.

What I saw was staggering. There were huge, uprooted trees lying flat over roads, making access to homes impossible. Thirty-foot high mounds of tree branches and unrecognizable debris were all over. FUBAR was everywhere you looked.

People had their roofs blown off, with the harsh sun beating down on them. They were found wading around their homes in knee-high deep water acting dazed and zombie-like.

Prepare To Defend Property

I learned that you need to be prepared for a hurricane. Then you need to be prepared to defend your property.

A girlfriend who was in the eye of Hurricane Andrew saw her couch fly out the window as she ran into an adjacent room. Afterward, her husband slept for short periods of time in his running truck for two weeks, just to feel some cool air during the day. He stayed up all night, sitting by the front door with a shotgun.

Hurricane Irma- Andrew On Steroids

Hurricane Irma was like Andrew on steroids.  Everyone was/is affected, and most people were affected significantly.

A friend showed us a picture yesterday of a famous bar in the Upper Keys that is there no more. The roof is sitting on the sand, and the building is gone.

The Keys

As of now, no one is allowed into the Keys. I heard that just yesterday they started to open up some of Highway 1. There are still many trees down, covering the only road to get there. The military is using tanks to plow over fallen trees, in order to get to the people who ignored the evacuation order. All of the Keys is supposedly destroyed. Some people are living in tents outside of their homes. If they managed to salvage a tent.

And everyone knows that the east side of the hurricane is the “dirty” side. In this case, it could spawn hundreds and maybe thousands of tornadoes.

Natural Disaster Like Going Through Boot Camp

Going through a natural disaster like Hurricane Irma is like going through boot camp. At least that’s the closest analogy I can think of, having not actually been through boot camp. It tests and uses up every fiber of your emotional and physical strength, to the last drop, and then it squeezes out a few more drops.

I had this dream before the storm. It was of those biblical guys, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, not burning in the furnace they were thrown into.  I felt like I went into an oven and came out alive. Really.

Physical Stress

There is incredible physical stress. I could only sleep three hours a night and could barely eat. I couldn’t even eat a whole yogurt. Don’t worry about that diet you were on. You won’t even remember to eat. I lost five pounds in one week.

Emotional Stress

Then there’s the emotional stress of a Cat 5 Hurricane headed right toward you, only an hour away. Lucky for me, it turned due east in the last moments. Otherwise, I wouldn’t be writing this story.

Read More @ SurvivalBlog.com

Puerto Rico collapse now leading to total chaos… no food, no water, gang members robbing citizens at gunpoint

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by Jayson Veley, Natural News:

Chances are most Americans have seen some kind of science fiction movie about the end of the world once or twice in their life. But while Hollywood does a good job of keeping us on the edge of our seats at the movie theater, there really are people in this world who are forced to fight day in and day out just to survive. These are the people who truly understand the importance of prepping, because when everything is taken away from you, items that you used to take for granted like food, water and shelter suddenly turn into the difference between life and death.

When Hurricane Maria plowed through Puerto Rico earlier this month, it left nothing but chaos and destruction in its path. In a relatively short amount of time, millions of people found themselves without power, without the means to communicate over long distances, and without the essential resources needed to survive like food and clean water. If nothing else, the tragedy that occurred in Puerto Rico is a perfect example of why prepping is so important – you never know when those survival situations that you watch on the big screen are going to become a reality.

Many people believe that prepping for life off the grid is far too expensive and challenging for anyone other than a professional survivalist to accomplish. However, a simple breakdown of the preparation process reveals that prepping is something everyone can – and should – be doing. Because if you were to ever find yourself unprepared in a survival situation, where food is scarce and electrical power is virtually nonexistent, the chances that you will be able to live on and prosper are significantly decreased. (Related: Here are ten good reasons why prepping is important even if SHTF never happens.)

Next to food, clean water, and a structurally-sufficient shelter, it is strongly advised that all preppers have a bug out bag, so that in the likely event that at some point you need to travel from point A to point B, you can do so without leaving valuable resources behind. A bug out bag should contain items like medical equipment, backup communication devices in case your primary communication tools stop working, spare cash and extra clothes. The bug out bag, as you can probably tell, significantly decreases the time it takes to escape a danger zone because it enables you to grab all essential items at once, rather than spending time collecting them.

Part of prepping for a natural or manmade disaster requires one to have a clear, foolproof escape route so that you can easily get from point A to point B in the quickest and the most efficient way possible. Everyone in your family should be familiar with the escape route as well, and in the event that everyone becomes separated, it helps to have a rendezvous point established ahead of time.

The prepper understands the fact that surviving off the grid requires one to be physically fit in order to complete the challenges that they will inevitably encounter on a day-to-day basis. Therefore, sticking to a healthy diet and cutting out most or all junk food consumption is absolutely essential. Working out multiple times each week should also be a necessity for anyone that is serious about prepping, because living life off the grid requires an enormous amount of stamina and physical strength.

Truth be told, you don’t have to be Bear Grylls or some other professional survivalist to prepare yourself for a survival situation. After you stock up on food and clean water, and once you have a safe place to use as your shelter, the rest simply comes down to educating yourself about self-sufficiency and how to live without the technologies most of us use today. Anyone can do it – what is your excuse?

Read More @ NaturalNews.com

Puerto Rico: What It’s Really Like After the SHTF

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by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

Things are dire in Puerto Rico. We haven’t heard much directly from people there since Hurricane Maria took out power for the entire island, but what we do know is that the situation is desperate. This is a shocking, real-life glimpse into what it’s really like when the S hits the fan.

I saw a post from a friend of a friend who has family in Puerto Rico. I don’t have permission to share names, but here’s what she said:

“My family has lost everything. My uncle with stage 4 cancer is in so much pain and stuck in the hospital. However conditions in the island are far worse than we imagined and my greatest fear has been made reality. The chaos has begun. The mosquitos have multiplied like the plague. Dead livestock are all over the island including in whatever fresh water supplies they have.

My family has been robbed and have lost whatever little they had left. The gang members are robbing people at gun point and the island is in desperation. People are shooting each other at gas stations to get fuel.

They’re telling us to rescue them and get them out of the island because they are scared for their lives. We’re talking about 3.5 million people on an island, with no food, no drinking water, no electricity, homes are gone. Family if you have the means to get your people out, do it. This is just the first week. Imagine the days and weeks to come. These are bad people doing bad things to our most vulnerable.

Imagine a few weeks with no resources and the most vulnerable become desperate. What are you capable of doing if your children are sick and hungry? We have to help.”

I decided to vet what I could, and I believe this horrible story is absolutely true. I confirmed that there is very little food, no fresh water, 97{5f621241b214ad2ec6cd4f506191303eb2f57539ef282de243c880c2b328a528} are still without power, limited cell signals have stymied communications, and hospitals are struggling to keep people alive. There is no 911. Help is not on the way. If you have no cash, you can’t buy anything. As people get more desperate, violence increases.

Never doubt that such an event could happen to any of us, no matter how carefully we prepare. Your best-laid plans could be swept away by a storm, flood, or fire. The immediate support most people have grown to expect might not be on the way.

Here’s what I learned.

Many homes were completely destroyed.

In the town of Catano, more than 60{5f621241b214ad2ec6cd4f506191303eb2f57539ef282de243c880c2b328a528} of the residents are homeless due to the storm. At the shelter in Catano, the bathrooms flooded and sewage backed up into the building. There is food, but no water. It’s hot, dark, and the stench is overwhelming. There is more than one person at the shelter who is diabetic, and there is no ice for their insulin. (source)

Rivera Aviles, a Cataño city council member who set up the shelter with the help of her husband, found that her home was devastated, too.

She and her husband evacuated before the storm because their house — made of wood — is close to the water’s edge. After Maria passed she returned home and was shocked that “the entire roof was blown off.”

“Everything got wet — the beds, furniture, everything,” she says. The water damage has made it unlivable. (source)

The homes that are still standing were horribly damaged. “Even in homes that remain standing on the island, water damage and power outages have destroyed most belongings, medicine, and food.” (source)

Read More @ TheOrganicPrepper.ca

Caution! It’s Shockingly Easy To Overdose On These Vitamins And Minerals

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from Joshua Krause, Ready Nutrition:

Everyone wants to make sure that they’re consuming all of the vitamins and minerals that they need. Giving your body what it needs is one of the simplest things you can do to stay healthy. Unfortunately, most people don’t eat the daily recommended amounts of every nutrient on a regular basis. If they did, the supplement industry in America wouldn’t be raking in $122 billion per year. Taking a pill to shore up a dietary deficit is incredibly convenient, and Americans are willing to pay a lot for that convenience.

Unfortunately, this convenience also comes with a risk. Making vitamins and minerals easier to consume also it makes it easier overdose on them. It’s pretty difficult to eat too many nutrients in food form, but depending on what nutrient you’re talking about, a few pills can seriously hurt you, or even kill. Among these supplements, here are a few that you should be aware of.

Iron

Consuming more than 45mg of iron a day is enough constitute an overdose in most people. For men that’s only about 5 times the recommended daily allowance (RDA), and less than 3 times for women. A severe overdose can lead to vomiting, diarrhea rapid breathing and heart rate, seizures, and unconsciousness. Often sufferers will feel better after a couple of days, before experiencing liver failure. Children are especially vulnerable to iron poisoning, which is why most chewable multivitamins contain very little iron.

Vitamin A

Because this vitamin tends to build up in the body, it’s fairly easy to take too much of it. Some studies have suggested that taking double the RDA of vitamin A on a regular basis is enough to cause birth defects and liver damage. Exceeding that dosage on a regular basis can cause poor vision, nausea, peeling skin, jaundice, hair loss, bone pain, mouth ulcers, and poor appetite. Overall, it sounds an awful lot like radiation sickness in vitamin form.

Zinc

I can speak about this from personal experience. I once took two zinc pills after I forgot that I had taken one earlier in the day. It was not fun, to say the least. I felt chills, nausea, light-headed, and a suffered from a rather foggy brain for several hours. However, I got off lucky.

Taking too much zinc can cause vomiting headaches, cramps, diarrhea, and in the worst cases can lead to kidney failure. Taking too much zinc over a long period of time can cause anemia, heart problems, and seriously mess up your immune system, which will make you more vulnerable to all kinds of infections. Which is ironic, since most people take zinc to support their immune systems.

Calcium

This may be one of the easiest nutrients to overuse. That’s because we’re all constantly told to consume more calcium to keep our bones strong and to prevent osteoporosis. The problem with that, is that it’s probably safe to say that most people living in the developed world don’t have a calcium deficiency. We have one of the most dairy rich diets on the planet, so it’s not something we should be too concerned about.

When you combine those two factors, it’s easy to see how the average person could be consuming too much calcium. We already eat a lot of dairy, and since we’re all so concerned about getting more calcium, lots of foods are fortified with this mineral. And on top of that, there are a lot of people who consume calcium based antacids on a regular basis. And finally, supplementing vitamin D is also pretty common, which increases calcium absorption. The last thing we need is to be taking calcium supplements, but we do.

You probably shouldn’t supplement calcium unless a doctor tells you to, because consuming too much calcium over a long period of time can lead to kidney stones, kidney damage, or even kidney failure. One study found that only eating a slightly more than the RDA can significantly increase your risk of developing heart disease, or die of any cause. Other studies have suggested that eating too much calcium can actually weaken your bones.

Read More @ ReadyNutrition.com