Sunday, February 24, 2019

Everything You Want (and Need) To Know About Long-Term Canned Food Storage. (Plus 10 Signs To Look For When It’s Spoiled)

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by Lisa Egan, Ready Nutrition:

You’ve likely got a nice supply of canned goods in your pantry and food storage inventory, but how long do those products truly last?

Will they still be safe to eat when a disaster arises and you need to start popping those cans open and consuming their contents?

“Best by”, “sell by”, “use by”, “best before”, and expiration dates are all terms used on food packaging, and they are often a source of confusion.

6 Critical Tips You Need to Know In Order To Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Freezing Temperatures

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by Tess Pennington, Ready Nutrition:

With the unusual winter weather that many parts of the country are experiencing, driving conditions will be harsh and potentially dangerous. Moreover, getting stranded in your vehicle could become a very real threat, especially if you are traveling in isolated parts of the country. If this happens, you have a potentially dangerous survival situation on your hands.

Most people’s instinct will tell them to leave the car and go for help. If you are in a desolate area, you may not know how far help is and leaving your car will expose you and could get you lost in the wilderness if you don’t know where you are going.

6 Critical Tips You Need to Know In Order To Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Freezing Temperatures

OK, let’s put your survival know-how to the test. Here’s the scenario:

At 3 p.m., a last minute work order has requested you to deliver some equipment but you must drive through a remote area where the road’s elevation is between 4,000 and 4,500 feet. The road is infamous for people who don’t know the area to take in the wintertime and get stuck, but you’ve driven it a few times and feel confident you can make it before dark. Before you set out, you turn on your GPS on your cell phone just in case. You’ve also checked the weather station, which turns out is calling for unexpected snow flurries in the area, but you’re on a deadline and will drive very carefully. 

Not a lot of people are driving on the road and you wish you could be at home too. The snow has been coming down for most of the trip making the roads slick. An hour into driving, you unknowingly make a wrong turn and end up on a remote logging road. The snow is really coming down making it difficult to see and you are losing daylight fast.

You curse your GPS for not telling you where to turn but realize you’ve lost signal and have no idea where you are. You decide to turn the car around and go out the way you came. As you get to the edge of the road, you lose traction and slide into a snow bank. 

As you try to free the car from the snow bank, the car won’t budge. You feel yourself panicking as you weigh all the problems – you’ve taken a wrong turn and are on a remote logging road, no one is in sight, you’re stuck in a snow bank and it’s dark outside. 

How to Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Winter

So, what would you do if you were in this situation? Do you have the skills to get out alive?

Let’s look at some considerations to keep in mind:

  1. Keep calm. In this type of situation, you could be stranded for hours or in some cases, days. Mental preparedness is key and you must think rationally and logically. This is easier said than done when you’re in a survival situation.
  2. Stay in your car. Above all, exposure will be your greatest threat. Survival experts stress that it is easier for authorities to find you in your car than find you wandering in unknown territory.
  3. Have a vehicle preparedness kit. This emergency kit should reflect the season your area is experiencing and the terrain you are driving through. In winter, you want to have preps on hand to keep the core body warm. Items like a whistle, brightly colored rag or ribbon, thermos, hand warmers, emergency blankets, emergency beacon, a first aid kit, and flashlight. For a more in-depth article on critical items to carry in your vehicle, click here.
  4. Have survival food and water in the car at all times. Keep the basics in mind for food and water. Snow can be melted for water (have a portable water filter in your preparedness car kit. Protein bars, MRE’s or easy survival foods can be utilized for this emergency situation.
  5. Make your car visible. Have a bright colored rag or ribbon and tie it onto your car so that search parties can find you. Even using a reflective sun shade could help alert authorities to your whereabouts.
  6. Run your vehicle every 10 minutes. If your gasoline amount allows, run your vehicle to stay warm. You can bring heat to the interior of the car and charge your cell phone at the same time. Note: Make sure the exhaust pipe of the car is unobstructed from snow. If snow is covering the pipe, this could cause exhaust fumes to enter your car and cause health issues.

Read More @ ReadyNutrition.com

Another Massive Blackout Struck Puerto Rico Last Night

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by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

Last night, an explosion at a San Juan power plant regressed Puerto Rico’s efforts to restore power to the island five months after Hurricane Maria struck a massive blow. Much of Northern Puerto Rico has suffered another blackout, including the capital city.

The island’s Electric Power Authority said several municipalities were without power, including parts of the capital, San Juan, but they were optimistic it could be restored within a day as they worked to repair a substation that controls voltage…

…It was not immediately known what caused Sunday’s fire, which was quickly extinguished. Officials said the explosion knocked two other substations offline and caused a total loss of 400 megawatts worth of generation. (source)

Before this explosion, more than a million people were still without power from the Category 4 hurricane that struck the island on Sept. 20, 2017. They’ve been thrown back in time by a hundred years, with no power, no running water, and damaged homes.

This is a prime example of how disasters aren’t just one-time occurrences. They’re very often followed by subsequent disasters.

Think about it. Fires are often followed by floods which are followed by mudslides and sinkholes. (See California for reference.)  The tsunami in Japan was followed by a nuclear plant disaster. Hurricane Harvey in Texas had storm surges and floods that caused a chemical plant to explode a few days later. Now, this already-stressed infrastructure has crumbled again under it’s increasing demand.

Power has been restored to a few critical locations.

This is one situation in which living in a more populated area can benefit you. After last night’s explosion, workers were quick to restore power to specific locations.

By late Sunday, electricity workers had been able to restore power to key locations, including the Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in Carolina, as well as the Medical Center. (source)

As well, after Hurricane Maria, the first areas to resume some form of normalcy were the ones with higher population. San Juan saw it’s power restored immediately but people in more remote areas are still waiting. And not just a few people.

Vox estimated that 1.36 million Americans are still without electricity. You’ll see other numbers that say 400,000, but that is counting households, not individuals.

The US Army Corps of Engineers… estimated that Puerto Rico would need 50,000 utility poles and 6,500 miles of cable to restore its power system…

…When an electrical circuit is open or broken, the power doesn’t flow, whether that’s a flashlight or a phone.

It’s a simple concept, but when it happens in the electricity grid — what engineers say is the largestmost complex machine ever built — it quickly becomes a byzantine problem.

With thousands of miles of transmission lines, gigawatts of generation, computers that route power, frequency regulators, and transformers that all serve the constantly fluctuating needs of millions of people, lots of things can go wrong. Generators can shut down. Transformers can explode. Power demand and supply can fall out of balance.

By far the most common cause of blackouts is damage to power lines, which are the most vulnerable part of the electrical grid to storms.

“In a disruption like this, it’s transmission and distribution,” Marsters said. “Damage does occur to generation assets, but those are point specific and you can get those back online in a reasonable time.”

…Puerto Ricans are now desperately trying to connect the main power arteries to individual homes, and some have resorted to their own makeshift repairs, mounting their own utility poles and stringing up low-voltage transmission lines. (source)

But even before Hurricane Maria made landfall, things with the infrastructure were dire.

The power grid in Puerto Rico was in rough shape BEFORE Maria

Even before the hurricane devastated the island, the infrastructure was in terrible shape, a fact underlined by last night’s explosion.

The blast illustrated the challenges of restoring a power grid that was already crumbling before it was devastated by the Category 4 hurricane.

In many cases, power workers are repairing equipment that should have long been replaced but remained online due to the power authority’s yearslong financial crisis. PREPA is worth roughly $4 billion, carries $9 billion in debt and has long been criticized for political patronage and inefficiency. It also struggled with frequent blackouts, including an island-wide outage in September 2016.  (source)

Before Maria made landfall, I wrote an article that predicted a long haul to get power restored.

It’s entirely possible that Hurricane Maria will put the island in the dark for quite some time to come, completely changing their way of life. 70,000 people are still without power from their bout with Irma, and much more damage to the utility system is expected. Gov. Rossello said:

“We will not have sustainable electric infrastructure in the near future. We will be bringing in crews from outside of Puerto Rico to attend to these measures.”(source)

Philipe Schoene Roura, the editor of a San Juan, Puerto Rico-based newspaper, Caribbean Business, wrote:

Prepa Executive Director Ricardo Ramos Rodríguez recently said the powerlines carrying electricity in the public corporation’s system are in such a deteriorated state that a strong storm could leave the island without power for weeks.

“To give you a number, if during Hurricane Georges 100 lines went down in 1998, today the same [kind of ] hurricane would bring down 1,000,” the official candidly told Caribbean Business when asked about the possibility of Prepa’s system effectively withstanding the onslaught of a similar storm.

“The lifespan of most of Prepa’s equipment has expired. There is a risk that in light of this dismal infrastructure situation, a large atmospheric event hitting Puerto Rico could wreak havoc because we are talking about a very vulnerable and fragile system at the moment,” Ramos added…

…Francisco Guerrero (a fictitious name to protect his identity), a Prepa field worker for 23 years, said it would take months for Prepa to bring up Puerto Rico’s power system should a hurricane like Harvey strike the island.

The lack of linemen and other technical personnel, as well as a lack of equipment—including replacement utility poles for powerlines and replacement parts—are the issues of greatest concern among public corporation employees, who say they risk their lives working with equipment in poor condition that provides them with little safety.

Guerrero said that today only 580 linemen remain out of the 1,300 who were part of the workforce in previous years—and that’s not counting the upcoming retirement of another 90 linemen. Likewise, he said there are only 300 electrical line testers to serve the entire island.

The source also said that much of Prepa’s equipment dates back to the 1950s—and the more “modern” equipment that is still functional dates from the 1990s; in other words, it’s from the past century.

“If a hurricane like this one [Harvey] hits us, the system is not going to come online, I’d say, in over six months. Right now, the warehouses don’t even have materials. I’m talking about utility poles and other stuff,” Guerrero explained.

“How can you say that you have equipment that dates back to the 1950s and you are not buying parts to repair them? When it’s time for maintenance work, you don’t have the part and you leave things as they are, but there is an entry in the log saying maintenance was done. And yes, it was done, but the most important thing was not done, which was to replace that part,” he added.

Although he did not assign the debacle to former Prepa Chief Restructuring Officer Lisa Donahue’s order to stop buying supplies as the main cause for the lack of materials, he is certain the order was “the straw that broke the camel’s back.” (source)

Many people thought it was a ridiculous premise and that power would be up and running within a couple of weeks. But it turns out, that was cognitive dissonance. This situation is all the proof you need to see that things can change overnight.

Go watch this video to see what everyday life is like in Puerto Rico for nearly half a million people.

Do you think things will ever be the same in Puerto Rico?

Have the residents of the island been permanently thrown back into Third World status? Will the power ever be fully restored? And considering they’re Americans too, isn’t it rather embarrassing that we aren’t doing more to aid in the recovery?

Read More @ TheOrganicPrepper.ca

Survival and Prepping Chat – Tracking & Countertracking

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from Reality Survival & Prepping:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCphkLmfM10

Why Cast Iron is a Prepper Essential

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by Joshua Krause, Ready Nutrition:

There’s nothing better than a hard day in the winter of cutting wood than coming home at the end of the day with a Dutch oven sitting on top of your wood stove with elk cuts, carrots, potatoes, onions, celery, and garlic marinating in broth and seasoned up…hot and ready to eat. In the morning, just add some wood to the fire you banked, heat up the stove, and make a nice stack of pancakes on your cast iron griddle along with some eggs and bacon.

Cast iron is coming back into fashion in a lot of ways. Even in the cities, many people cook over a gas stove with cast iron cookware. Poisonous Teflon coating is avoided, as well as “Chinese Steel,” a term of yours truly to describe steel that appears to be stainless, but is not totally steel and is mixed with other metals. Aluminum is not good to cook with and high concentrations in the bloodstream are linked to Alzheimer’s in studies.

Turn Trash Into Treasure: The Easy Way To Make A Compost Pile Or Bin

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by Mac Slavo, SHTF Plan:

Composting not only reduces trash in landfills but also improves your backyard at home. Your garden will produce healthier vegetables and more beautiful flowers with just the addition of a compost pile. Composting doesn’t have to be difficult and although it may seem like a daunting task to get started, this helpful guide should help walk you through any rough patches.

Bomb Shelter Sales “Skyrocket” In California As Nuclear Fears Spike

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from ZeroHedge:

Equity investors today failed to follow through on initial efforts to “Buy The Fucking Fire and Fury Dip” but they are apparently rushing out to buy their very own doomsday bunkers on the off chance that President Trump wasn’t joking yesterday when he offered the following warning to North Korea:

Apparently the comments have spooked some folks on America’s west coast who are thought to be within Kim Jong Un’s nuclear strike radius. And while a global nuclear confrontation is generally viewed as a bad thing, for Ron Hubbard, President of Atlas Survival Shelters in Los Angeles, it has resulted in an economic windfall.  Here’s more from The Sacramento Bee:

“It’s crazy, I’ve never seen anything like it,” Ron Hubbard, president of Atlas Survival Shelters, told Fox11. “It’s all over the country. I sold shelters today in North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, California.”

 

The company, based in Montebello in eastern Los Angeles, sells shelters priced from $10,000 to $100,000. Hubbard told the station that the shelters are designed to be buried 20 feet below ground and can sustain survivors for up to one year, depending on the size and model.

 

He told the station he had sold more than 30 units in recent days, including to customers in Japan.

Meanwhile, Bloomberg reports that Vivos, another shelter manufacturer in Del Mar, Calif., near San Diego, also has experienced a spike in business.

“Japan’s going hog wild right now,” said Ron Hubbard, owner of Atlas Survival. The Montebello, California-based company makes about a dozen different underground refuge models intended to be inhabitable for six months to a year, some outfitted with escape tunnels, decontamination rooms and bulletproof hatches.

 

“People are getting off the fence – we’ve got thousands and thousands of applications,” said Robert Vicino, founder and chief executive officer of Vivos, Spanish for “alive.”

 

Vivos sells models for individual and communal use, and the company has built subterranean survival communities in the U.S. and Europe. The latest, xPoint, covers 9,000 acres in South Dakota with 575 off-grid dugouts. Planned amenities include a community theater, hydroponic gardens, shooting ranges, restaurant and bar. Shelters in the community are available for lease with an up-front cost of $25,000. Vicino told Bloomberg about 50 units have been leased or reserved.

Read More @ ZeroHedge.com

Tincture basics: Recipe for making home remedies

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by Rhonda Johansson, Natural News:

Tinctures are liquid extracts made from medicinal plants. Because they are made from natural ingredients, tinctures are able to alleviate various symptoms of certain diseases with little to no side effects. Most people buy their tinctures from their local herbal store but what many don’t realize is that they are actually quite easy to make. This short guide will walk you through several simple recipes that you can try at home. (h/t to WildernessCollege.com.)

Tinctures are typically made using alcohol as their base. Other bases such as vinegar or glycerin can be used but they are less effective in extracting the medicinal constituents of the plant. Make sure that you choose an alcohol that is made for human consumption. We’d recommend using a clear vodka or a grain alcohol that is 95 percent alcohol (or 190 proof). For most of the recipes that we will be discussing, you would need to let the tincture sit for around two weeks. After this time, you can then strain it and pour it to a small dropper bottle. Take note that tinctures are meant to be medicine. Use only small amounts, and add only a little bit to your tea, juice, water, or directly into your mouth.

Three recipes to try

The first recipe involves the burdock root. Historical evidence as well as scientific data have shown burdock root to be effective in reducing fevers and improving the immune response. The herb is also high in inulin which is a powerful prebiotic. Consuming prebiotics improve your gut flora and lessen the likelihood of getting sick.

There is a discussion on which part of the burdock is more medically beneficial: its seeds or root. In general, the seeds are typically “stronger” in its effect than the root. That is, burdock seeds address symptoms of acute stages of an illness whereas the root is better for chronic diseases. This makes the root more permanent in terms of action and is the reason why we’d recommend using the root for this tincture.

  • Clean and cut several fresh burdock roots.
  • Place the chopped pieces in a glass container.
  • Use a vodka that is 100 proof (50 percent alcohol content).
  • Follow a ratio of 2:1; for every two cups of vodka, add one cup of fresh roots. If you are using dried roots, the ratio is at 5:1 (five cups of vodka to one cup dried roots).

The next recipe is for a dandelion tincture. This “weed” is a noted blood purifier. The constituents of dandelion improve the digestive system. Dandelions are also great diuretics. Many healers use dandelion tinctures to improve the function of the liver.

  • Clean and cut several fresh roots or leaves.
  • Place these in a clean container.
  • Use a vodka that is 90 proof (45 percent alcohol content).
  • Follow a ratio of 2:1; for every two cups of vodka, add one cup of fresh roots.  If you are using dried roots, the ratio is at 5:1 (five cups of vodka to one cup dried roots).

The last recipe is for a stinging nettle tincture. Stinging nettle is a detoxifier. The herb can boost your immune system, improve energy levels, and support skin health. It is helpful for allergies. Women who have painful menstruation or who are bleeding heavily are suggested a stinging nettle tincture. (Related: Powerful Plant Based Detoxification.)

  • Clean and cut fresh or shred dried plants.
  • Put the shredded pieces in a clean container.
  • Use a vodka that is 100 proof (50 percent alcohol content).
  • Follow a ratio of 2:1; for every two cups of vodka, add one cup of plant material.

Read More @ NaturalNews.com

A How-To Guide For Installing A Home Garden

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by Chris Martenson, Peak Prosperity:

If you’ve been intending to become a gardener but aren’t quite sure yet how to get started, this how-to guide is for you.

It chronicles the steps that I successfully followed to put in my own garden this year, in my spare time, all while working hard on the Peak Prosperity business as well as traveling frequently for work. From start to finish, it was a 1-manpower project – showing that if I could get this done on my own given my crazy work schedule, most anyone can do this, too.

Hopefully this guide will give you the direction, inspiration, and confidence that you, too, can be tending your own well-constructed garden beds soon.

Ready Nutrition: Power Protein Pancakes – Just Add Water

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by Jeremiah Johnson, Ready Nutrition:

Recently Mrs. Johnson went out on a buying mission and obtained something that I find will be excellent to add to the supplies. Kodiak Cakes is a pancake and waffle mix that is manufactured in a plant in Park City, Utah. What’s the big deal on this? First of all, the ingredients are actually good for you: flour of wheat and oats, along with egg whites, wheat protein, sea salt, and honey, for starters. It also has yeast and baking soda.

A box of this stuff will give about 13 servings: each serving is (3) pancakes of 4” in diameter. Here are the stats on a serving of these:

This Emergency Food Storage Tip Could be a Lifesaver if the Grid Goes Down in the Summer

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by Jeremiah Johnson, Ready Nutrition:
ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, you’re already all too familiar with the ins and outs of different types of food preservation. We once did an article on what actions to take in the event of an EMP where the power supply to your refrigerator disappears, possibly forever. But do we really truly sit back and take stock of the gravity of the situation regarding the seasons? Yes, most people try to cram their refrigerators and freezers full of food even during the summer months. It is the summer months that it is time to “divest” your earnings and diversify your food “portfolio,” so to speak.

There Is No “Perfect” Location for Preppers: You MUST Make the Best of Where You Are

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by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

In the prepping world, discussions abound about the “perfect” location for preppers. According to most, it has to be rural, it needs to have a crystal clear stream running through it, acres of garden space, a mature orchard, and it needs to be off-grid (or ready to be so at the flip of a switch.) Heck, I’ve written about thismyself. I’ve lived in that “perfect” location.

But the reality is that although some live in that situation, most of us do not. For most of us, the demands of work, family, and budget mean that we live someplace that is not perfect. And moreover, even those places that sound perfect, aren’t necessarily all they’re cracked up to be.

GUN-TOTING ROBBER WALTZES INTO CONVENIENCE STORE, CLERK IMMEDIATELY OPENS FIRE [VIDEO]

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from The Daily Sheeple:

A Smoke 4 Less store clerk in Durham, North Carolina got into a shootout with an armed robber, and police just released the video Thursday.

It’s pretty incredible.

WATCH: 

First of all, you gotta give props to this clerk. From my detailed, CSI-level video analysis he was already brandishing his weapon before the masked gunman even entered the store.

Now that’s some emergency preparedness.

He likely saw the robber coming in via the parking lot security camera, which police have also released.

WATCH:

I like this camera angle because it shows just how quickly this thug tucked his tail and ran. He may have planned to rob a Smoke 4 Less, but he was definitely not looking to get Smoked 4 his actions.

Read More @ TheDailySheeple.com