Thursday, October 6, 2022

Complaints About Crop Damage Spur Temporary Ban on Dicamba in 2 States

by Julie Fidler, Natural Society:
On July 7, 2017, officials in Arkansas and Missouri enacted a temporary ban on dicamba, the herbicide blamed for vaporizing and damaging crops which have not been genetically engineered to withstand the weedkiller. The Arkansas Plant Board had voted June 23, 2017 to temporarily ban the spraying of dicamba on any crops except pasture land for 120 days. [1]

The newest ban, set to start July 11, 2017, extends the 120-day moratorium.

The bans come as complaints about suspected dicamba drift continue to snowball. More than 130 cases of dicamba drift have already been reported in Missouri this year, eclipsing last year’s totals, which resulted in heavy crop losses for farmers in the Bootheel region of the southeastern part of the state.

Remember the BP Deepwater Horizon oil catastrophe? The oil was eaten up by ocean microbes (because Mother Nature heals itself)

0

by Isabelle Z., Natural News:
When the oil drilling rig, known as Deepwater Horizon, that was operating off the Gulf of Mexico around 40 miles from the Louisiana coast suddenly exploded and sank in April 2010, 11 people died and oil began to spill into the ocean a mile blow its surface. In just three months, the BP Deepwater Horizon fiasco saw 4.9 million barrels of oil spilling into the Gulf of Mexico. As the biggest oil spill in our nation’s history, it led to damages exceeding $17.2 billion.

The environmental effects were staggering, with as many as 80 million young fish believed to be killed, along with around a third of the worms and snails living near the well. Moreover, the spill resulted in the deaths of around 50,000 birds, 120 bottlenose dolphins, and 8,000 young sea turtles. While some of these species can be replenished in a decade or two, it will take around 300 years for the 120 deepwater corals that died to recover.

Despite widespread concern about whether it was even possible to clean up an oil spill of this magnitude, the oil somehow disappeared on its own. Scientists put forth a lot of theories, and new research has uncovered that oil-degrading bacteria deserve the credit for cleaning up the spill.

Experts ‘Concerned’ Because Long Valley Caldera Volcano Is ‘Moving’ – High Number Of Earthquakes ‘Indicators Of Pending Volcanic Eruption’

0

by Stefan Stanford, All News Pipeline:
Long Valley Caldera near Mammoth Lakes has experts “concerned” because over the last 100 days the volcano has been “acting up” as NewsPrepper describes it and the unusual amount of Earthquakes that have hit Mammoth lake over the last month means all eyes should be carefully watching these earthquakes and especially this particular volcano.

In 1915, Lassen Peak erupted and wrecked a huge portion of the state. Over the last 100 days, the much larger Long Valley Caldera has begun acting-up. And what it’s doing has Geologists at the US Geological Survey “concerned.” The Caldera – the mouth of the Volcano – is . . . . moving.

According to scientific instruments monitored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) the area in vicinity of the Long Valley caldera is deforming and moving rapidly compared to previous records. How sure are they? “95{5f621241b214ad2ec6cd4f506191303eb2f57539ef282de243c880c2b328a528} (confidence interval), the (data) ensemble is significant”

The 75,000 Mile Wide Hole In The Sun Could Black Out Earth’s Communications

0

by Mac Slavo, SHTFPlan:
The sunspot spotted by NASA as our sun creeps toward its solar minimum is 75,000 miles wide.  That has huge implications for our satellites and communications systems, and the sunspot could cause some blackouts on Earth.

The huge sunspot has the potential to send out dangerous solar flares known to take out important communication equipment, satellites, and even huge sections of the power grid. This sunspot is the first to appear after the sun was spotless for 2 days and the dark core is larger than the Earth.