Coincidence? Military Industrial Complex Hit Highest Stock Prices Ever As Govt Hypes North Korea War

by Claire Bernish, Activist Post:

Feckless boasts of military might and icy vows to annihilate one another might not necessarily prove war between the U.S., North Korea, and their allies is nigh, but the monumental increase in stocks of weapons and defense manufacturers — the economic fingerprints a preparation for a colossal military endeavor — just might.

“North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States,” President Trump railed yesterday. “They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.”

If, as legendary author John Steinbeck posited, “all war is a symptom of man’s failure as a thinking animal,” than the altogether avoidable rush for violent, physical confrontation with North Korea — currently unfolding by the hour — could easily be deemed foolishness of the highest order.

After all, when nations resort to verbal sparring over the size and force of one another’s … militaries, it’s difficult not to picture world leaders as children hurling insults in a sandbox — a disturbing mental image only worsened by the fact Trump and perhaps Kim hold keys to arsenals with nuclear capabilities never before seen on Earth.

Horrifying recollections of bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the United States in World War II precisely 72 years ago — the latter, to the day — paint a cold if prescient portent of the need for defense.

Keen to shore up defenses amid the latest iterations of political tumult between the cloistered totalitarian regime and the supposed Land of the Free, a number of Lockheed Martin’s customer nations are snatching up missile defense systems in preparation for what some analysts contend may be the next world war.

Fear has infected the planet — so the fraught business of national defense is booming.

“The level of dialogue around missile defense is now at the prime minister and minister of defense level,” vice president of Lockheed’s Air and Missile Defense business, Tom Cahill, noted in an interview with Reuters, which added,

Some countries are putting missile defense at the top of their list of desired capabilities, Cahill said. Interest has increased over the last 12 to 18 months, as have threats, he said.

Shares of Lockheed are up nearly 8 percent, to $300.10, since North Korea’s first long-range missile test on July 4. The stock is up 20 percent year-to-date.

Of course, that was yesterday. Today, Lockheed Martin stocks continue to rise — just prior to publication, stocks hovered around $305 per share — and show no indications of falling to levels typical of a less charged global atmosphere.

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