Britain’s Socialized Healthcare Now Recommends Against Herbal Treatments

Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) is a shining example of everything socialized medicine has to offer.

The NHS prevents parents from seeking experimental treatments for terminally ill children.

The government can deem patients close to death, and remove feeding tubes to starve them to death. This was once called the Liverpool Care Pathway, which has since been renamed, but not changed.

The NHS will even cut patients off from all government care if they catch them paying for their own care elsewhere, or using natural healing methods.

Recently the NHS decided obese patients and smokers are not eligible for hip and knee replacements.

And now, the NHS is recommending doctors no longer prescribe herbal and homeopathic treatments to patients.

A report released last week by the NHS recommends what drugs and medicines doctors should no longer prescribe. Some might see this and think the health service is finally getting rid of some dangerous and expensive pharmaceuticals. But the exact opposite is the case.

Here are the guidelines for how the NHS chose what to trim:

  • Items of low clinical effectiveness, where there is a lack of robust evidence of
    clinical effectiveness or there are significant safety concerns;
  • Items which are clinically effective but where more cost-effective products are
    available, including products that have been subject to excessive price
    inflation; or
  • Items which are clinically effective but, due to the nature of the product, are
    deemed a low priority for NHS funding

That last bullet is especially telling. They basically keep it obscure enough so that they can recommend not prescribing anything they want. But also they admit right there that even if something works, but has a lower cost alternative, that is a good way to save money. It is this one size fits all approach which focuses more on the bottom line than on an individual patient.

Officially, these guidelines are meant to save limited resources for the NHS. But they aren’t taking a chunk out of their £9 billion budget by deprescribing dangerous and expensive pharmaceutical drugs.

Instead, they are nixing herbal treatments, on which the NHS currently spends £100,009 per year. Most other suggestions in the report cut out treatments which cost millions, or tens of millions of dollars. But these comparatively cheap solutions somehow also made it to the chopping block.