The Triumph of Collectivism

by Jeff Thomas, International Man:

The French Revolution began in 1789. Maximilien Robespierre was one of its most eager proponents. An extreme left-winger, he sought a totalitarian rule that claimed to be “for the people” (echoing the recently successful American Revolution), but in reality was “for the rulers.” He in turn inspired Karl Marx, author of The Communist Manifesto.

Both Robespierre and Marx had been well-born and well-educated but rather spoiled and, as young adults, found that they had no particular talent or inclination to pay their own way in life through gainful employment. Consequently, they shared a hatred for those who succeeded economically through their own efforts and sought a governmental system that would drain such people of their achievements, to be shared amongst those who had achieved less.

Interestingly, neither one saw himself as a mere equal to the proletariat that they championed. Each saw himself in the role of the one who was to cut up the spoils and make the decisions for the rest of society.

It’s worthy of note that collectivist leaders never see themselves as becoming the humble and patient recipients of whatever bones the government chooses to throw them. They always see themselves in the role of rulers.

Collectivism has remained unchanged in its essence to the present day. It attracts those who would take the productivity of others, enrich themselves, and dole out the remainder to the masses. Seen in this light, collectivism would seem abhorrent. Who in his right mind would wish to lose his freedom, to end up as a member of the lumpenproletariat?

But collectivism has thrived, based on one human emotion—jealousy. Collectivist leaders have learned to sell the people on the enslavement of collectivism by convincing them that those they envy will be brought down—to have their gains taken from them and distributed by the state to those who are less able or less inspired.

Let’s have a look at a few quotes from some of the most noted collectivists and see how their ideas are holding up in today’s world…

“The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation.” – Vladimir Lenin

“The best way to destroy the capitalist system is to debauch the currency.” – Vladimir Lenin

Both of these principles are moving rapidly ahead in the EU, US, and other “advanced” countries. Taxation in both jurisdictions is already high and leaders plan increases. Inflation is claimed to be necessary, although they claim the present level to be lower than it really is. In fact, it’s unnecessary. It was only a century ago that income tax became institutionalised, robbing people steadily of their wealth without them realizing it, through inflation.

The euro, which gobbled up dozens of independent currencies, is in trouble, and the dollar is nearing the end of its ability to function. They will both soon be destroyed, very much as Comrade Lenin would have wished.

Another primary objective is to dictate what constitutes truth.

“Make the lie big, make it simple, keep saying it and eventually, they will believe it.” – Joseph Goebbels

“A lie told often enough becomes the truth.” – Vladimir Lenin

“Print is the sharpest and the strongest weapon of our party.” – Joseph Stalin

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