Was Marc Faber Blackballed For Speaking The Truth?

by Karl Denninger, Market-Ticker:

Well-known "Doctor Doom" Marc Faber was effectively expelled ("resigned" technically) from three boards and CNBC has said they will not book him in the future after his latest newsletter came out.

In it he said:

"Thank God white people populated America and not the blacks," wrote Mr. Faber, who is managing director with investment advisory and fund management firm Marc Faber Ltd., in his latest monthly newsletter.

"Otherwise the U.S. would look like Zimbabwe, which it might look like one day anyway, but at least America enjoyed 200 years in the economic and political sun under a white majority."

This of course was instantly pounced on by damn near everyone as an outrageously racist statement.

When challenged he doubled down:

"If stating some historical facts makes me a racist, then I suppose that I am a racist," Mr. Faber later told Bloomberg news service in an e-mail.

There's a point in there that nobody wants to talk about, of course, because it will instantly lead you to being branded "racist" -- exactly as happened here.

Can we have a debate or talk about facts in a civil society today without being instantly blackballed if your point of view isn't sufficiently politically correct?  It appears not.  Does it matter if you cite actual facts?  Apparently not.

For example, if you remember the "bathroom bill" screamfest one of the points made is that it enables creeps to sexually assault people, including children.  I don't recall anyone saying that all transgender people are creeps, however, that it enables creeps was alleged.  The retort was that such an assault has never happened and won't.

It turns out that's a lie: A 10 year old girl was in fact assaulted by a man claiming to be a woman.  Said person has now been convicted.  The not-funny part of this is that I cannot find in the news stores on this conviction when the assault happened.  You don't go to trial on a felony criminal count in an afternoon; it frequently takes a year or more.  Was that assault known during the debate on the North Carolina Bathroom debacle, and intentionally buried by the media so it could not be part of the debate and ensuing lawsuits?

Should we re-examine the current status of same in light of the fact that the existence of this assault was intentionally buried, is now known, and balance the risks with the rewards of allowing people who are in fact men into the women's room?

Yes.

Will we?

No.

Zimbabwe and what has happened there is a historical fact.  What happened here in America is also a historical fact.

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