U.S. Food Production Has Taken A Very Dangerous Turn In The Wrong Direction

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by Michael Snyder, End Of The American Dream:

If farmers and ranchers don’t produce enough food, we don’t eat.  So we should always be very thankful for our hard working farmers and ranchers.  Unfortunately, farms and ranches all over the United States have been hit by a string of disasters in recent months, and as a result food production has taken a turn for the worse.  So does that mean that we should expect that there will soon be shortages of certain items?  Unfortunately, it appears that is likely to be the case.  For example, it is being reported that approximately 90 percent of Georgia’s peach crop for this year has been destroyed

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Summer is around the corner, and in Georgia, summer means peaches.

But horticulturists at the University of Georgia say roughly 90% of the Peach State’s crop has been destroyed by bad weather and a warming climate.

The last time things were this bad was 1955, according to Lawton Pearson of Pearson Farm in Fort Valley, Georgia.

I really love a good peach.

But if you want to sink your teeth into some fresh peaches in the months ahead, they won’t be coming from Georgia

So don’t count on sinking your teeth into a peach from the Peach State anytime soon.

“Not Georgia peaches,” Pearson says. “I don’t think you’ll see Georgia peaches in the grocery store.”

Perhaps you are thinking that we will just eat more oranges instead.

Unfortunately, it is being projected that a combination of factors will cause Florida’s orange harvest to be 56 percent smaller this year

Florida’s citrus industry posted its worse harvest since 1937, which should give orange fans some pause at the supermarket.

Damage from the 2022 hurricane season, combined with the impact of citrus greening disease, is ravaging the Sunshine State’s orange crop.

This will likely cause citrus prices to skyrocket nationwide, as Florida farmers recorded its smallest orange harvest in 90 years, according to the state’s latest agriculture report.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said in January that only 18 million boxes of Florida oranges would be on the market in 2023, a 56 percent drop from last year.

I think that there will still be Florida orange juice in the stores.

But I also think that it will cost a lot more.

Meanwhile, there is grave concern about the winter wheat harvest in the middle of the country.

At this point, the drought has been so bad that over one-fourth of all winter wheat in the state of Kansas might not even get harvested

Month after month without enough rain has made Kansas the epicenter of a stubborn drought covering parts of the Great Plains.

While the drought that plagued almost the entire western half of the U.S. last year has relented, it has only gotten worse in Kansas. The state is experiencing the most severe drought in the country and its worst in a decade.

If rains don’t come soon, more than one-quarter of the state’s wheat fields could be in such dismal conditions farmers don’t even harvest them, according to Kansas Wheat.

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