Manufacturing Plants Aren’t Just Mysteriously Getting Burned Down In The United States, It’s Happening Around The World…

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by Alicia Powe, The Gateway Pundit:

As Americans tackle accelerating inflation, skyrocketing gas prices and food and baby formula shortages following the manufactured COVID pandemic, manufacturing plants are mysteriously being burned down on a regular basis.

In 2021, Resilinc, a leading global supply chain monitoring and risk management firm that has been tracking disruptions at manufacturing plants for over a decade, was prompted to create a WarRoom to track the sudden uptick of supply chain disruptions.

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The company issued 11,642 to alerts notifying its, which include today’s largest multinational organizations, about supply chain disruptions; an 88 percent increase in supply chain disruptions in a single year.

North America experienced the 5,417 supply chain disruptions, more than any other developed nation, followed by Europe which saw 2,838 and Asia, 2,128.

Manufacturing plants aren’t accidentally getting destroyed in the United States. Destructive fires like those raging across in food factories across the United States have suspiciously become commonplace around the world.

More factory fires occurred in 2021 than any year in recorded history.

Nearly a quarter of the supply chain disruptions globally were attributed to manufacturing plants being set aflame, according to exclusive data compiled from Resilinc’s EventWatch monitoring database.

“Resilinc issued 1,946 Factory Fire alerts in 2021, an increase of 129 percent year-over year,” Resilinc communications director Melissa Gieringer said in a statement issued to the Gateway Pundit.

The company  attributes the sudden cause of fires to labor shortages caused by the pandemic.

“The uptick is due mostly to gaps in regulatory and process execution as well as shortage of skilled labor in warehouses. Factory fires are contributing to record breaking supply shortages. If a warehouse goes down for a month due to a factory fire the trickle-down effect is huge,” Gieringer said. ” If no one is checking that the fire sprinklers work, or if there are flammable materials – like cardboard – left on the floor because there is not enough staff available to clean up, it can turn into a bad scenario.”

“Take this example: In October 2020  a fire broke out at a semiconductor manufacturing plant in Japan; it took three days to put the fire out and when the dust settled, production lines were estimated to be down a minimum of six months,” she continued. “As a result, procurement teams – from the hi-tech to automotive sectors – were scrambling. The price of some chips went from $5 to $110 in a matter of days and ultimately cost sourcing organizations tens of millions of dollars. A risk assessment survey later revealed that the site did not have anyone checking the automatic sprinkler or fire suppression system. This fire also contributed to the current chip shortage that is significantly impacting carmakers.”

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