The blue state exodus: How Americans fled New York and California for Republican states of Arizona, Idaho and the Sun Belt to escape lockdowns and skyrocketing crime

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by James Gordon, Daily Mail:

People fled New York, Illinois and California for Texas, Idaho, Arizona and The Carolinas according to data from moving company North American Van Lines
The states of Florida, Texas, and Colorado also saw a greater influx of movers
Despite the pandemic the company claim people continued to move at rates that were comparable to 2019
The data showed that states that have much less densely populated areas were a big draw for people looking to relocate amid the COVID-19 pandemic
The move away from the likes of New York was driven, in part, by an increased fear of living in densely populated cities and rising crime amid the pandemic

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The pandemic saw people leave Democratic blue states in droves and head towards sunnier climes in the red states of the south to escape the strict lockdowns and spiraling crime.

A migration report from moving company North American Moving Services found those living in the states of New York, CaliforniaIllinois, New Jersey and Maryland headed for Arizona, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina and Idaho.

Four of the top seven states people were fleeing were located in the Northeast where the pandemic stuck first.

Out of the moves conducted in Illinois, almost 70% were people moving out of the state.

People fled New York, Illinois and California for Texas, Idaho, Arizona and The Carolinas according to data from moving company North American Van Lines

People fled New York, Illinois and California for Texas, Idaho, Arizona and The Carolinas according to data from moving company North American Van Lines

Cities in Texas, Arizona and Denver were popular places to move to while the cities of New York, Chicago, San Diego and Anaheim in California saw the most departures

Cities in Texas, Arizona and Denver were popular places to move to while the cities of New York, Chicago, San Diego and Anaheim in California saw the most departures

The company say Phoenix, Houston and Dallas were the top three cities welcoming new residents while New York City, Anaheim and San Diego in California saw the highest numbers of people leave.

The move away from the likes of New York was driven, in part, by an increased fear of living in densely populated cities amid the pandemic.

In addition to grappling COVID-19, New York City in particular has also struggled with escalating crime and homelessness in recent months.

Police say crime has spiked in Manhattan after hundreds of homeless were rehoused there because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through the first five months of 2021, the total number of major crimes measured by the police department has been at its lowest level since comparable statistics became available in the 1990s

Through the first five months of 2021, the total number of major crimes measured by the police department has been at its lowest level since comparable statistics became available in the 1990s

The move away from the likes of New York was driven, in part, by an increased fear of living in densely populated cities and rising crime amid the pandemic

The move away from the likes of New York was driven, in part, by an increased fear of living in densely populated cities and rising crime amid the pandemic

On Monday, Mayor Bill de Blasio on Monday downplayed the violence and chaos that has been occurring in recent weeks that has seen people partying until the early hours of the morning.

Elsewhere across the country this weekend, one of 14 people shot in a mass shooting in Austin has since died of their injuries; one man was killed and seven injured in a drive-by shooting in Savannah; three men were killed in Cleveland; and a woman was gunned down in Chicago.

Murders are also currently up 60 percent in Atlanta compared to last year.

Police fear the explosion of shootings and violent crimes in recent months is a long term trend rather than just a blip.

In Austin, 25 year-old IT worker Douglas John Kantor died in hospital on Sunday after he was one of 14 people shot at random on a street packed with bars hours earlier.

Kantor, who was a tourist from New York, was shot through the abdomen when shots rang out at about 1.30am on Saturday in the Sixth Street area when two men opened fire on each other.

Aside from crimeresearchers also found among the reasons people were picking up and heading to the Sun Belt states were job availability, the cost of living and harsh winters.

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