Broken – Rx in the US

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by Bob Rinear, The International Forecaster:

There are some things swirling around in my head, that I’d like to talk about, but I’m simply not prepared for it yet. Why? Because if my theory is right, and unfortunately it could be, we are witnessing the biggest Satanic, evil movement, in the history of mankind.

There are some things swirling around in my head, that I’d like to talk about, but I’m simply not prepared for it yet. Why? Because if my theory is right, and unfortunately it could be, we are witnessing the biggest Satanic, evil movement, in the history of mankind.

Maybe that’s what they’d call in the movie industry a “trailer,” and maybe it is. I’m still formulating my Theory, and it’s so out there, it’s so completely beyond what normal people could believe that other people could do, I’ve got to work on it for a bit. But it’s coming. Stay tuned.

TRUTH LIVES on at https://sgtreport.tv/

In the meantime, I want to relay a story. A true story and it involves me, and our “medical” system. Why? Because something is beyond broken. Way beyond.

Like most people, as I’ve been aging, things are showing up healthwise that no one likes to talk about. For some unknown reason, my body loves to produce blood clots. I’ve suffered through 3 pulmonary embolisms and two Deep vein Thrombosis in my leg.

No one knows why. I’m not diabetic, I’ve been screened for the particular cancers that can cause such an issue, I’m always within 20 lbs of my High School graduation weight. I eat pretty darned healthy and I don’t smoke. Until my wife developed Breast Cancer, as many of you know, each Sunday afternoon was 5+ miles on the bike and a 2+ hike on the beach. So lack of exercise isn’t the issue.

I’ve been fighting with this since 2012. So naturally I’m on blood thinners. The old standard “coumadin” works, is cheap, and has been in use for 70 years. But, it’s somewhat of a pain in the butt. You need to check your blood at least bi-weekly to make sure your levels are correct, and there’s dietary restrictions, certain foods you can’t eat.

When I got hit with the DVT in my leg, that was problematic, as I was already on a blood thinner and that’s not supposed to happen. So after a zillion scans, blood tests for specific cancers, etc, they decided I’d need to try a different thinner and they chose Xarelto.

Well, if you’re not familiar with it, it’s one of the new, supposed wonder drugs for this situation. There’s NO dietary restrictions, and no need for weekly testing. One pill a day and you go on with life. Does it work? So far, as it’s been 2 years since my last clot up, but time will tell.

Now here’s the interesting part. Since it’s new it’s patented and no one else can make it for years. So the company that makes it has a monopoly. They can charge what they want and boy are they proud of this stuff. When I asked my pharmacist how much it would be, she said around 450 bucks a month.

Whoa. Coumadin is like 6 bucks. But it failed to work for me. But she gave me a card from the company, and for about 10 months I got the stuff for about 20 bucks a month. Hey, that I can live with!  But, one day I trot in to get my script and she says “hey, the company card has hit maximum, and even with your insurance it’s 249.95.”

I said a quite audible “ouch!’ and she said something like “hey, if it wasn’t for your insurance kicking in, it would be 419, so consider that.” So, with no pills left and no idea what to do, I paid the 250 and left.

Not long after, I had the ability to switch my primary doctor away from the outfit I’d used for quite some time. They had grown to the point where they were more like a machine spitting out patients instead of doctors with the time to listen.

So, I meet up with my new doctor, and going over all the crap I’ve been through he agreed that I should probably stay the course on Xaralto. So, I said “look Doc, I know there’s priorities in life and paying 250 bucks a month or more, if it’s going to save my life shouldn’t be an issue, but is there any alternatives other than coumadin?”

He said “Go downstairs to our pharmacy, and tell them you want the cash price. I think you’ll be happy.”  So, after the appointment, I stroll down to the pharmacy in his building and I ask “Doc says I should ask the cash price of my 20mg’s of Xaralto”. The gal looks me straight in the eye and says “40 dollars.”

Huh?  I couldn’t process it. How could it be 250 with an insurance card, and 40 bucks here cash? That can’t be.

The following is from the outfit called “GoodRX” that can often get you discounts at your pharmacy. These are on their site as of 4.6.2021 for 20 mg’s of Xaralto

Publix $493.02 with the free coupon

Walgreens $519.22 with free coupon
Target $526.20 with free coupon
CVS $524.178 with free coupon.

So, I asked again. “I’m sorry, I didn’t hear you correctly, did you say 40 dollars?” She replied, yes, That’s correct.  So, I said “can you fill that now?”  Yep.

Ten minutes later I’m walking out with 30, 20 MG tablets of Xaralto for 40 bucks.  Now, can someone tell me what the hell is going on?? How can it be 500 bucks at CVS, 250 on my insurance, and yet I can pay 40 bucks at this pharmacy???

Are things so crooked that they’re simply gouging the public AND the insurance companies for what ever price they want, but the “right” people get it for under 40 bucks?  You tell me.

On 3.31.2021 I strolled back in to that Pharmacy to get my refill, just fearing the fist time was some mistake and I’d get slammed. Nope, 40 bucks later and I’m out the door with my new bottle.

But wait it gets “better” or worse. Since I’m laying it out there, I’ve suffered terrible dry skin areas at times since I was 20. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin disease that causes an itchy rash with flaky scales. It causes redness on light skin and light patches on darker skin. It’s also called dandruff, cradle cap, seborrhea, seborrheic eczema, and seborrheic psoriasis.  Yeah, swell right? Like who needs it.

I’ve learned how to deal with it by daily moisturizing for years on end. But the doc said, go upstairs and see the dermatologist for a minute. Okay, he called upstairs, she said come on up, and took a quick look. She hands me a script for a cream, she says “this is the real deal, it will help a lot.”  So I go to my “normal” pharmacy, and they tell me, “this isn’t covered by your insurance.” I ask how much is it? Over 150 bucks.

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