UFO Hype Is Probably Just the US Military Lying Again

0
332

by Caitlin Johnstone, Consortium News:

The U.S. military has for years been using mass media to inflame public interest in alleged UFOs, and it’s entirely possible it is a domestic ploy to get more Space Force funding, writes Caitlin Johnstone.

“No Longer in Shadows, Pentagon’s U.F.O. Unit Will Make Some Findings Public” reads a New York Times headline that is understandably attracting a great deal of attention today.

True to form, the Times had to hastily issue an embarrassing correction to the article after initially reporting that former Senate majority leader Harry Reid “believed that crashes of vehicles from other worlds had occurred and that retrieved materials had been studied secretly for decades”, when in fact Reid merely believes “crashes of objects of unknown origin may have occurred”.

Still though, it’s understandable that this article has captured public fascination. It reports that a Pentagon unit dedicated to the study of UFOs will begin making some of its investigations public, with the most attention-grabbing quotes coming from a former Pentagon consultant (emphasis mine):

Eric W. Davis, an astrophysicist who worked as a subcontractor and then a consultant for the Pentagon U.F.O. program since 2007, said that, in some cases, examination of the materials had so far failed to determine their source and led him to conclude, “We couldn’t make it ourselves.”

The constraints on discussing classified programs — and the ambiguity of information cited in unclassified slides from the briefings — have put officials who have studied U.F.O.s in the position of stating their views without presenting any hard evidence.

Mr. Davis, who now works for Aerospace Corporation, a defense contractor, said he gave a classified briefing to a Defense Department agency as recently as March about retrievals from “off-world vehicles not made on this earth.”

Of course, whenever you see an article reporting anything about the U.S. war machine in The New York Times, your response should always be intense skepticism.

A potentially more revealing quote in this Times article than what was said by Mr Davis was provided by Senator Marco Rubio (again, emphasis mine):

Senator Marco Rubio, the Florida Republican who is the acting chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, told a CBS affiliate in Miami this month that he was primarily concerned about reports of unidentified aircraft over American military bases — and that it was in the government’s interest to find out who was responsible.

He expressed concerns that China or Russia or some other adversary had made “some technological leap” that “allows them to conduct this sort of activity.”

So the New York Times article offers us two possibilities for these UFO phenomena:

  1. That there are “vehicles not made on this earth” taking a keen interest in U.S. military bases for some strange reason, or
  2. That this is actually some secret super advanced technology possessed by the Russians or the Chinese.

Option #1 makes little sense. Why would a species so advanced that it has mastered interstellar travel have any interest in human governments and their military forces?

Option #2 reminds one of the bogus “missile gap” narrative that JFK dishonestly sold the American public about the Soviets holding military superiority over the U.S. in their nuclear arsenal. And anyway if a foreign government has this military technology, why didn’t they use it to become the top military superpower years ago?

Completely unexamined by the Times, to nobody’s surprise, is a third possibility: that the U.S. war machine is lying.

Read More @ ConsortiumNews.com