Damning new evidence that Dr Kelly DIDN’T commit suicide: The disturbing flaws in the official government story surrounding the death of Blair’s chemical weapons expert

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by Miles Goslett, Daily Mail:

Damning new evidence that Dr Kelly DIDN’T commit suicide: The disturbing flaws in the official government story surrounding the death of Blair’s chemical weapons expert

  • Official explanation was that the weapons expert had taken his own life 
  • But since Dr Kelly’s death in 2003, time has done nothing to dispel suspicion 
  • Successive governments have refused to allow full coroner’s inquest to be held 

More than 15 years have passed since Dr David Kelly was found dead in an Oxfordshire wood in one of the darkest episodes of Tony Blair’s time as Prime Minister.

The official explanation was that the distinguished weapons expert had taken his own life by overdosing on painkillers and cutting his left wrist, devastated after being unmasked as the source of the BBC’s claim that the Government had ‘sexed up’ the case for the Iraq War.

But since Dr Kelly’s death in 2003, time has done nothing to dispel the cloud of suspicion that hangs over the episode. The troubling questions surrounding it have only increased as the years have passed.

Successive governments have refused to allow a full coroner’s inquest to be held, fuelling the sense of a cover-up.

Since Dr Kelly’s death in 2003, time has done nothing to dispel the cloud of suspicion that hangs over it

Since Dr Kelly’s death in 2003, time has done nothing to dispel the cloud of suspicion that hangs over it

I have spent years examining the case and, like some surgeons, barristers, coroners and judges I know of, I cannot accept the official explanation that Dr Kelly took his own life.

Last year, I published a book containing the evidence I had discovered. Since then, I have amassed more compelling information from new, highly credible sources – evidence which casts yet more serious doubt on the claims that Dr Kelly cut his own wrists. It also raises further disturbing questions about the circumstances of his death.

By continuing my investigation, I have sometimes been dismissed as a conspiracy theorist. But I have no political axe to grind, and there is nothing fantastical about the facts of this case.

The official explanation was that the distinguished weapons expert had taken his own life

The official explanation was that the distinguished weapons expert had taken his own life

The 59-year-old scientist’s body was discovered on July 18, 2003, days after he had been grilled publicly in front of a Select Committee of MPs about his contact with the BBC journalist Andrew Gilligan.

Gilligan had reported that the Government dossier, which claimed Iraq could deploy weapons of mass destruction at 45 minutes’ notice, was unreliable – exaggerated or ‘sexed up’ for political purposes.

And Dr Kelly, a chemical weapons expert who worked for the Foreign Office and Ministry of Defence, was soon unmasked by Downing Street officials as the BBC’s informant.

He always denied being the main source of the story but was nonetheless thrust into the spotlight against his will.

Less than an hour after Dr Kelly’s body was discovered – and before it had been formally identified or seen by a medical professional who could estimate a cause of death – Blair instructed his Lord Chancellor and an old friend from university, Charles Falconer, to set up a public inquiry into the circumstances surrounding his death.

Lord Hutton was hand-picked to chair the inquiry, which eventually concluded that Dr Kelly took his life and cleared the Government of wrongdoing.

The wood where the body of Dr David Kelly was found - Tony Blair set up a public inquiry into the circumstances surrounding his death soon after the discovery 

The wood where the body of Dr David Kelly was found – Tony Blair set up a public inquiry into the circumstances surrounding his death soon after the discovery

Dr David Kelly arrives at the House of Commons July 15, 2003 in London England

Dr David Kelly arrives at the House of Commons July 15, 2003 in London England

But the establishment of the Hutton Inquiry ensured that the microscopic investigation of the death which would have happened during a coroner’s inquest never took place. Whereas the coroner would have had formal powers, the Hutton Inquiry had none.

Witnesses could not be compelled to attend, no evidence was given on oath, and Hutton had total control over who would appear and what documents could be disclosed.

The result, in the eyes of many, was a whitewash.

In his report, Hutton concluded that Dr Kelly had taken his life and that nobody could have anticipated this. He stated that ‘the principal cause of death was bleeding from incised wounds to his left wrist which Dr Kelly had inflicted on himself with the knife found beside his body’.

He said that Dr Kelly had coronary heart disease, that there were co-proxamol painkillers in his blood, and that these things might have helped bring about death ‘more certainly and more rapidly’.

Read More @ DailyMail.co.uk

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