Climate Change & the Blame Game has been going on Since the 1890s

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by Martin Armstrong, Armstrong Economics:

COMMENT: I really get annoyed by people who say well it has been warm here so what happens elsewhere is irrelevant. They are idiots and cannot see the whole and just want to blame humans for everything. I can see how our situation is hopeless when it comes to climate change.

All the best

ANSWER: Very true. I got one email saying even though the death toll in Wales is double that of the previous year from extreme cold, it was warmer here in Canada so you are just wrong about everything. Such people are unable to divorce themselves from their bias. We have a serious climate change unfolding that cyclically is on time.

Ever since 1895, the media has alternated reporting between global cooling and warming scares and many times they have even been overlapping. Here are accounts from the press reporting both global cooling and warming between 1955 and 1961. From 1895 until the 1930s the media peddled a coming ice age. From the late 1920s until the 1960’s they warned of global warming. From the 1950s until the 1970s they warned us again of a coming ice age. This makes modern global warming the fourth estate’s fourth attempt to promote opposing climate change fears during the last 100 years.

Then we have the diehard Global Warming crowd who refuse to ever consider that just maybe they may be wrong and are doing exactly the same thing I encountered when doing research on the Great Depression. Back then, they claimed that the DUST BOWL permanently destroyed the “Middle West” and that all the soil blew away so there would NEVER AGAIN be farming in America. ALL the government “expert advice” blamed the catastrophe on mechanized agriculture because tractors had been in use for only a couple of decades. They theorized how the tractors caused the Dust Bowl and this became very popular. The government even put out films calling it the Plow that Broke the Plains. But the old-time farmers remembered the droughts of the 1890s. There had been 10 years of rain in the Midwest and the forecasts at that time saw no change in sight.

The mechanism of plowing increased the yield dramatically and this contributed to the decline in employment in the Agricultural industry from 70% of the Civil Workforce in 1850 to 40% by 1900 and then 3% by 1980. The price of wheat declined dramatically from World War I into 1932. A severe drought hit the midwestern and southern plains. As the crops die, the ‘black blizzards” began which is more commonly known to history as the Dust Bowl. It lasted for 8.6 years until the rains returned in 1939.

By December 1935, there was a meeting in Pueblo, Colorado, where experts then estimate that 850,000,000 tons of topsoil had blown off the Southern Plains during the course of one year. They forecast that should the drought continue, the total area affected would increase from 4,350,000 acres to 5,350,000 acres in the spring of 1936. They warned that the damage was permanent. To try to intervene, the C.H. Wilson of the Resettlement Administration proposed buying up 2,250,000 acres and retiring it from cultivation.

In February 1936, the mass migration out of the Midwest created what were called hobos without money or a job. The Los Angeles Police Chief James E. Davis sent 125 policemen to patrol the borders of Arizona and Oregon to keep “undesirables” out of California. As a result, the American Civil Liberties Union sued the city. Even the Democrats forcible deported Mexicans during the Dust Bowl. The Mexican Repatriation was a mass deportation of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans from the United States which went into 1936. The estimates of how many were forcibly deported range from 400,000 to 2,000,000. Yet, it was a sort of ethnic cleansing for an estimated 60% of those deported were actually born in the United States.

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