Is It Okay To Celebrate Halloween? For Many Americans, It Is A Time For Blood Rituals And Unspeakable Acts Of Evil

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by Michael Snyder, End Of The American Dream:

What I am about to share with you is incredibly disturbing.  Every year on October 31st, some of the most horrifying acts imaginable are carried out in dark corners and back rooms all across America.  In this article, you are going to read about some of those acts.  But for most Americans, Halloween is a supposedly “innocent” holiday that is all about dressing up, eating lots of candy and having fun.  When I was growing up, I gladly participated in the festivities too, because I didn’t understand what the holiday was all about.  According to the National Retail Federation, approximately 70 percent of all Americans celebrate Halloween, and a total of somewhere around 9 billion dollars will be spent on the holiday this year.  But most Americans do not understand that almost all of our modern “Halloween traditions” have their roots in a bloody ancient pagan festival known as Samhain

The origins of Halloween are Celtic in tradition and have to do with observing the end of summer sacrifices to gods in Druidic tradition. In what is now Britain and France, it was the beginning of the Celtic year, and they believed Samhain, the lord of death, sent evil spirits abroad to attack humans, who could escape only by assuming disguises and looking like evil spirits themselves. The waning of the sun and the approach of dark winter made the evil spirits rejoice and play nasty tricks. Believe it or not, most of our Halloween practices can be traced back to these old pagan rites and superstitions.

Of course most Americans have never even heard of Samhain, but for those that are into witchcraft it is one of the most important days of the year.  The largest witchcraft tradition in America is known as “Wicca”, and if you do a Google search for “Wicca” and “Halloween” you will quickly discover that it is one of the key dates on their “wheel of the year”…

On the Wiccan calendar, known as the “wheel of the year” it is also the day when the god dies, to be reborn again on the Winter Solstice. Samhain is therefore the day when the veil between the living and the dead is considered thinnest, and is a time to remember people in our lives who have passed away.

You may not personally know any Wiccans, but the truth is that their numbers are absolutely exploding in the United States.  According to one recent news article, there were at least 340,000 of them living in America a decade ago…

While the US government does not regularly collect detailed religious data, because of concerns that it may violate the separation of church and state, several organizations have tried to fill the data gap. From 1990 to 2008, Trinity College in Connecticut ran three large, detailed religion surveys. Those have shown that Wicca grew tremendously over this period. From an estimated 8,000 Wiccans in 1990, they found there were about 340,000 practitioners in 2008.

And more recent polling suggests that there are now between 1 million and 1.5 million people that identify as either Wiccan or Pagan currently living in the United States…

Although Trinity College hasn’t run a survey since 2008, the Pew Research Center picked up the baton in 2014. It found that 0.4% of Americans, or around 1 to 1.5 million people, identify as Wicca or Pagan—which suggests continued robust growth for the communities.

So we are talking about a very large group of people.

Many Wiccans and Pagans seek to follow the ancient rituals as closely as possible, but there is one huge problem.

On Samhain, the rituals would often involve human blood.  According to Christian author Bill Schnoebelen, human sacrifice was absolutely essential for the Druidic ceremonies…

Druids worshiped the sun god, called by names like Bel (Ba’al?) or Chrom. On October 31, they believed that he died and went into the kingdom of the dead, Anwynn. The purpose of Samhain was to insure his return. Even witches admit this involved human sacrifice.

And according to an article in the Sun, animals and humans were both often “thrown in to huge firepits as offerings”…

But the reality of Halloween through the eyes of the Celts and Druids is scarier than any horror film.

According to old documents, in its most primitive guise, Samhain would have featured many sacrifices to the Celtic gods of death, with both animals and humans thrown in to huge firepits as offerings.

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