Christmas in an Amazon Culture

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from BATR:

“Oh for the good old days when people would stop Christmas shopping

when they ran out of money.” Author Unknown

Remembering the days when you shopped until you dropped seems to be from a time when socializing meant actually interacting with other people. Toys “Я” Us has lost its appeal because the reverse dynamics of spoiling the toddlers resists the challenge of braving the elements and cold temperatures to put wrapped presents under an artificial tree. Now, if it cannot arrive at the door delivered by USPS, UPS or FedEx; it’s just not desirable. The consumer culture has made a giant leap into the cyber space of emptiness and irrelevancy. Spending money and spreading the wealth no longer operates under the same rules that enriched the growth in the (PCE) personal consumption expenditures. The void of satisfaction in buying trendy gadgets and stylist apparel feeds a basic isolation from meaning or contentment.  

The Federal Reserve acknowledged, years ago; Don’t Expect Consumer Spending To Be the Engine of Economic Growth It Once Was. Be that as it may, the easy of placing an order online that sells its wears with free delivery has diminished the old concept that retail commerce actually impacts the expansion of prosperity in your own community.

This description of circumstances and forecast of developing trends should be apparent to anyone familiar with the changing landscapes in the shopping malls. Still the far more profound question about the very nature of the celebration around the Christmas season is an even more pronounced topic then the extinction of the friendly and helpful department store clerk.

Long ago the devotion to observe the birth of Jesus Christ has been lost by the majority in this society. Even among professed Christians, the lack of focus and recognition that Christmas is less of a religious observance than the more important holy day of Easter.  

In order to illustrate this analysis, a review about Christmas – Philosophy for Everyone by Scott C. Lowe (Editor) of Better Than a Lump of Coal, argues accordingly.

“The philosophical arguments presented such as Aristotle’s ‘virtue ethics’ (“Lying to Children About Santa: Why It’s Just Not Wrong”), Foucault’s social formation theories (“Making a List, Checking it Twice: The Santa Claus Surveillance System”), or Hume’s testimony of Miracles (‘Jesus, Mary and Hume: On the Possibility of the Virgin Birth”) are easily accessible to all audiences interested in the ultimate Christmas debate: secular or religious. For those more philosophically trained or inclined, the utilization of these philosophical works within the context of the great Christmas debate provide an alternative dimension into classic philosophical arguments of ethics and sociological structures, not typically revealed in academic literature.

The remaining question to be asked following each of these essays is: Has the secular nature of Christmas overtaken the religious underpinnings of the celebration in so far as we come full circle from a Pagan celebration of Winter Solstice, to the birth of Jesus Christ, to a new Commercial Christmas?”

Clearly our confused culture has abandoned much of the traditional canons of veracity and now operates under an extreme system of a dominating political correctness that offers little room for authentic individualistic values. What better example of this homogenized humanity than Jeff Bezos on Amazon’s culture: ‘We never claim that our approach is the right one’.

“A word about corporate cultures: for better or for worse, they are enduring, stable, hard to change. They can be a source of advantage or disadvantage. You can write down your corporate culture, but when you do so, you’re discovering it, uncovering it — not creating it. It is created slowly over time by the people and by events — by the stories of past success and failure that become a deep part of the company lore. If it’s a distinctive culture, it will fit certain people like a custom-made glove. The reason cultures are so stable in time is because people self-select. Someone energized by competitive zeal may select and be happy in one culture, while someone who loves to pioneer and invent may choose another. The world, thankfully, is full of many high-performing, highly distinctive corporate cultures. We never claim that our approach is the right one — just that it’s ours — and over the last two decades, we’ve collected a large group of like-minded people. Folks who find our approach energizing and meaningful.”

Bezos is certainly correct when he says that Amazon has collected a large group of like-minded people and more significantly that the Amazon culture does not contend to be the “right one”. This is exactly the point with the systematic decoupling of the human element in business transactions, much less than converging upon the spiritual and religious component in society.

Amazon is analogous to the dominance of the Roman Legions. The only difference is that in the technological age of immediate satisfaction, the fulfillment factor does not need to fear the wrath of corporal punishment, but only the loss of a fleeting pleasure.    

According to the Telegraph, With Amazon’s growing dominance, investors must learn to love the new conglomerates asks:

“The latest financial trend making a comeback is the global conglomerate, but this time it’s got a digital twist. US tech giants are ever-expanding into businesses beyond their core operations, creating sprawling businesses operating in many different areas. But the big issue for those of us that remember the fate of last century’s mega-conglomerates, such as Tiny Rowland’s Lonrho and the Hanson Trust, is that things did not end particularly well and most ended up being broken up into their constituent parts. So, given that history tends to repeat itself, will the new digital titans end up with the same fate?”

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